Two must-sees on screens from this weekend, A Quiet Place and Michael Inside, with Love, Simon, The Hurricane Heist and more also opening in cinemas.

Michael Inside *****
After celebrating creativity in Ballymun Lullaby and championing youth mental health in I Used to Live Here, writer-director Frank Berry has turned his attention to the prison system as a gullible 18-year-old ends up behind bars on a three-month sentence. From that first knock on the door Michael (Dafhyd Flynn) ages by the minute. 

As he tries to heed his grandfather Francis' (Lalor Roddy) advice about keeping his head down, Michael is drawn into the orbit of fellow prisoner David (Moe Dunford). Outside, the problems are piling up for Francis.

Stage set, you too are going through the wringer. Read our full review here.

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A Quiet Place *****
Emily Blunt and John Krasinski say that working together has always been on their bucket list as a couple.

They have certainly picked the right film. 

This foot-to-the-floor four-hander is proper old school when it comes to scares, but also makes sure that your emotional investment in the characters - mum, dad, kids - is huge. Read our full review here.

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The Hurricane Heist ***
From the director of the first The Fast and the Furious outing, The Hurricane Heist, willingly or not, drags viewers into the eye of the storm at gale force speed.

Yes, it's a tidal wave of cheesy dialogue, overcooked special effects, preposterous plots, and cardboard cut-out villains, but it's a breeze to watch.

The script never rises to the epic promise of its title, but if cinema-goers are looking to blow off some hot air (and for some priceless social commentary), then this disaster flick tops the escapist entertainment barometer.

It's easy to pick holes at a storyline that expects its audience to believe a criminal gang are capable of... Read our full review here.

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Ghost Stories ***
Ghost Stories offers a thought-provoking and disorientating series of unsettling ideas that delivers more goosebumps than gasps.

"The brain sees what it wants to see" is the ominous undertone of the big screen adaptation of the Olivier-nominated supernatural stage play, which is written and directed by Jeremy Dyson (The League of Gentlemen) and Andy Nyman (co-creator of the illusionist Derren Brown's television show).

The duo skilfully bring a profound sense of dread and lingering ambiguity to the intelligent British horror flick by trapping viewers in the dreamscapes of the characters' minds. 

The endlessly fascinating multi-layered swirl of a film is both an exploration of survivor's guilt, and toys with the idea that nothing is more frightening than the fear of being found out. 

Does the mind play tricks on us, or are we just suppressing our darkest thoughts? And so, the brain-bender begins. Read our full review here.

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Love, Simon ****
"No good deed goes unpunished" is wisdom that many a film character has learned the hard way down the decades. 

The latest is Simon Spier (Nick Robinson), the high school senior with the Midas touch who comes to the rescue of a fellow student online, only for the saloon doors of fate to wallop him right in the face.

Director Greg Berlanti (Dawson's CreekEverwood) and Everything, Everything star Robinson have done the state of teenhood some service with this adaptation of Becky Albertalli's award-winning Young Adult book, Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda. Read our full review here.

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Wonderstruck **
Wonderstruck alternates between different eras but fails to create an otherworldly experience.

The adaptation of the Young Adult novel by author and illustrator Brian Selznick, who also wrote the screenplay, tells the tale of two deaf pre-teens 50 years apart. Twelve-year-old daydreamer Ben (Oakes Fegley) is living in the rural Minnesota of 1977, and film buff Rose (Millicent Simmonds), also 12, lives in the New Jersey of 1927.

The ambitious plot is gorgeously mounted and a triumph of design, particularly the 'cabinet of wonders' at the New York Museum of History, but for all its noise and to-ing and fro-ing, the film's huge leap in logic comes off as farcical twaddle. Read our full review here.

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Thoroughbreds **
This wannabe noir stars Anya Taylor-Joy from The Witch and Split; Me and Earl and the Dying Girl and Bates Motel's Olivia Cooke; and the late Star Trek and Green Room actor Anton Yelchin in his final role. 

That's some line-up of talent, and for the first 20 minutes it looks like you and they could be rewarded. 

Not so. Read our full review here.

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Still Showing:

Isle of Dogs ****
Isle of Dogs, Wes Anderson's latest foray into stop-motion animation following 2009's Fantastic Mr. Fox, is charming, spectacularly visually inventive and drily witty, with just enough bite to keep things interesting.

The film draws on Anderson's love for Japanese culture and cinema and is a feast for the eyes, featuring lushly created sets (a whopping 240 of them) and expertly crafted puppets (an eye-watering 1,000 of those) to bring the story to life.

The action takes place in a dystopian future in Japan. Mayor Kobayashi, the totalitarian, cat-loving leader of Megasaki City, has decreed that all dogs must be banished after they catch a mysterious flu (the highly-hyped "snout fever") that he claims will soon be able to be passed onto their owners... Read our full review here.

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Ready Player One *****
A magic carpet ride whose trailer (deliberately?) doesn't do it justice, Ready Player One is Steven Spielberg having the most fun in decades as the curator-in-chief of all our yesterdays. And it's contagious. 

There are only two big spoilers below.

The first is that a 71-year-old director has aged in reverse and just turned 30. The second is that the audience for his new film are about to follow in the same direction but will be journeying all the way to single digits. Reeling in the years indeed. Read our full review here.

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Journeyman ***1/2
Journeyman delivers emotionally punchy scenes, but when it comes to taking risks, it fails to give viewers a vigorous workout.

Paddy Considine, the movie's director, writer and leading man, follows up 2011's Tyrannosaur with a heartfelt account of a veteran champion middleweight boxer whose life is turned upside down after he suffers a catastrophic brain injury.

The beating-the-odds tale is an eye-opening and well-intentioned examination of a man and his personal struggles to win back his family. Viewers are given an emotionally intense blow-by-blow account of Matty's (Considine) recovery as he faces the loss of speech, motor and memory functions. Read our full review here.

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Midnight Sun *
Midnight Sun is an overwrought and contrived weepy teen dramedy that becomes cumbersome and cliché-ridden within the first ten minutes.

The YA fluff tale centres on 17-year-old Katie (Bella Thorne) who suffers from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare skin disease that makes her allergic to the sun and forces her to be home-schooled by her over-protective father (Rob Riggle). Light comes into our lead's life when genetically gifted teen (Patrick Schwarzenegger) finally responds to her longing stares from her bedroom window.

You already know where this is heading... Read our full review here.

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