If you fancy a laugh this weekend, then Blockers is the movie for you, surprisingly better than it sounds. Also hitting the big screen is Pacific Rim Uprising, Unsane, Dark River and delightful French movie, I Got Life. 

Blockers ***1/2
Blockers has laugh-out-loud moments, heart and a lot of John Cena; a winning combination that makes it an instant classic of the coming of age comedy genre.

Julie (Newton), Kayla (Viswanathan) and Sam (Adlon) have been best friends since they started school and are about to go to prom, their last big night together before heading off to college. Somewhere in the planning stages they decide to make a pact to lose their virginities with their respective dates, but when Julie leaves her laptop open, their parents find out what they're planning and decide to do everything in their power to make sure they don't see it through.

What happens next is a stream of hilarious set pieces with Mann, Cena and Barinholtz a dream team with exceptional comic timing. Read our full review here.

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Dark River ****
Fans of The Affair and Luther who want to see Ruth Wilson tearing up the floorboards on the big screen will have their wishes granted in Dark River, a fine addition to the genre known as 'Tough British Drama'.

Wilson plays Alice, a wanderer who returns to the wreck-and-ruin homestead of 1,600 acres in West Yorkshire after the death of her abuser father (played by Sean Bean as a spectral presence throughout). Brother Joe (Mark Stanley) hasn't seen her in 20 years, and his reaction says that hasn't been long enough.

Writer-director Clio Barnard's two-hander plays like a relationship Western where you know that every icy stare, bitter word and tramp through the mud are all leading to a showdown. Wilson's true grit as Alice is evident from the get-go, with former Game of Thrones star Stanley pushing her all the way as the sibling with so much to say he doesn't know where to start. From scene to scene you don't know where to look. Read our full review here. 

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Pacific Rim Uprising **1/2
Pacific Rim, Guillermo del Toro's 2013 fanboy foray into machines and monsters, is his highest grossing film at the box office - $411m worldwide. It is also, by some amount of circuits and slime, his most divisive, moving people to tears for very different reasons. 

The battle lines drawn five years ago will remain in place after this sequel, which sees hostilities renewed between Earth's mechanised saviours, the Jaegers, and wide-mouthed creatures from the deep, the Kaiju. 

With Idris Elba's Stacker Pentecost and Charlie Hunnam's Raleigh Becket no longer part of this universe, John Boyega uses his Star Wars downtime to take on the role of Stacker's son, the sensibly named Jake. Read our full review here.

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A Wrinkle in Time *

Don’t bother loading up at the pick `n’ mix counter before seeing this bewildering fantasy sci-fi from director Ava DuVerney. There are enough primary colours and candy-coated sentiments to keep an army of kids going for days in the short running time.

Based on the 1962 novel by Madeleine L’Engle, A Wrinkle in Timetells the story of two young siblings, Meg (Storm Reid) and Charles Wallace (young Sheldon Cooper lookalike Deric McCabe), who are whisked off on an interstellar journey by  a trio of cliche-spouting galactic mavens named Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon), Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling) and Mrs. Which (Oprah Winfrey). Read our full review here.

Unsane **1/2
Unsane begins as a compelling psychological thriller before descending into pantomime drama, at times brilliant but overall lacking.

The film follows Sawyer (Foy), a woman who has relocated to a new city to get away from a man who has been stalking her for the last two years. As she settles into a new job and takes on the world of online dating, she tries to build a new life for herself, but she can't escape the fear that she is being watched and followed, which leads her to a therapist at a local behavioural centre.

Sawyer soon finds herself unknowingly committed to the facility for a 24-hour period, and as she pleads to be released, claiming that she doesn't belong there and is completely sane, the audience is forced to question her sanity, and whether or not she is delusional in her claims that her stalker has followed her to her new home. Read our full review here.

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I Got Life ****
If there is a female equivalent of a buddy movie it’s I Got Life!, an irreverent treatment of the theme of woman on the verge of menopause.

Aurore is the original French title of a movie first shown in this country at last year's French Film Festival, a better title really than the cheesy I Got Life, taken from the eponymous Nina Simone song which runs as a theme throughout the movie. Aurore (Agnès Jaoui) is the mother of two daughters, separated from her happy-go-lucky if frazelled husband, Nanar (Philippe Rebbot). She works as a waitress for a domineeringly sexist maitre d ' named Seb (Nicolas Chupin) until she has enough and throws in the towel. Read our full review here.

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Tomb Raider ***1/2
Hard to believe that it's all of 17 years since Angelina Jolie ambled around the cineplexes of the planet as the star of Lara Croft: Tomb Raider. Compared to your average Spider-Man reboot, this one has taken forever to arrive.

But was it worth the wait? We certainly think so.

Here, the wonderful Alicia Vikander takes on the Lara Croft mantle, and - typically - gives everything to the role. As anyone who's seen her in films as diverse as The Danish Girl and Ex Machina will tell you, the Swede punches well above her weight, and here she does that in a more literal sense as her limbs do most of the work. It's that kind of film. Read our full review here.

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Peter Rabbit ***1/2
The good news for anyone who regards Beatrix Potter's Peter Rabbit as something that mustn't be messed with is that their hero's in safe hands with movie director Will Gluck and star Domhnall Gleeson.

Gluck was reared on the exploits of the jacketed Peter, and passed on the love by reading the stories to his own children. And what he's created here is a broadening out of the tale, without losing any of the original's charm. No mean feat. And it's timeless, so no baseball hats, hoodies or mobile phones for the BP bunny, who is voiced by James Corden.

And the real magic here is the remarkable job done in terms of the CGI. It's ridiculously good. At this point, you don't even notice the blend of animation and real-lifers. It's seamless. Read our full review here.

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Mary Magdalene ****
Rooney Mara has just made March her own. And how.

Amid the post-Oscars scramble to catch films while they're still in cinemas, here's another with a central performance that is too good to miss. Chances are it won't be playing as long as its gilded contemporaries, so plan accordingly.

Reuniting with Lion director Garth Davis and Her co-star Joaquin Phoenix, Mara's work in this travelogue of the soul deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as her Oscar-nominated turns in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Carol. It's a struggle to imagine any of her peers bringing quite as much to this most misunderstood of figures - the mystery of Mara off-camera makes her all the more powerful on-screen. Read our full review here.

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Unless ***
Alan Gilsenan's adaptation of Carol Shields' final novel Unless has the delicate touch and the humanity that characterise his documentaries. Yet somehow one is left wanting more, and thinking too that Gilsenan's screenplay should have been based on a stronger novel.

We are in suburban, snowy Toronto and two decidedly middle-class parents are suddenly challenged by bad news. Dad, Tom Winters (Matt Craven), is a doctor; mum, Reta Winters (Catherine Keener), is a novelist. One of their three daughters, Norah (Hannah Gross), has dropped out of college and is sitting outside a bargain emporium on a sidewalk downtown. She is holding a piece of cardboard bearing the single word 'goodness'. Read our full review here.

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The Square **1/2
Christian (Claes Bang) is the museum director who ends up in serious trouble in Ruben Östlund's The Square, which was pipped to the post for Best Foreign Film by A Fantastic Woman at the Oscars. File under 'ho hum' or 'much ado about nothing', although it is engrossing.

It all begins with the wealthy museum gallery director Christian, whose phone, wallet and cuff-links (yes) are stolen in a three-person scam in a public square in Stockholm. Christian is on his way to work and having arrived there eventually he is more amused at his carelessness than angry. In fact, you could say he almost admires the ingenuity of the scam. Read our full review here.

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