Morrissey biopic England is Mine is our favourite film this week, but if you've younger viewers to please there's also The Emoji Movie and sci-fi adventure Valerian too.

England is Mine ****
If ever there was a music icon primed for an early years biopic it is Steven Patrick Morrissey, former frontman of The Smiths and current world-weary curmudgeon. For a figure who would pour all the vexations and morbid fascinations of his teen years into his highly-autobiographical songs, a portrait of the artist as a young man was long overdue.

England is Mine is not about the future indie icon but a nicely judged story of a cripplingly shy teen who, like countless other cripplingly shy teens, takes refuge in poetry and music as he fumbles his way through life's minor victories and defeats and eventually wills himself into existence. Read our full review here.

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The Emoji Movie **1/2
The Emoji Movie is no Toy Story or Lego Movie, but it's as least as enjoyable as the ridiculously overrated Avatar. Sure, it isn't as technically impressive, but the story's about as interesting.

TJ Miller - great in Silicon Valley - voices the lead character, Gene, who is an emoji that lives in Textopolis, a digital city inside the phone of his user, Alex. On his first day at work, Gene panics when he's being used and ends up making a confusing-looking expression. And so begins a tale of redemption and discovery, where Gene learns that being different isn't so bad, as well as realising that friendship matters. Read our full review here.

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Valerian **1/2
French director Luc Besson's adaptation of the French comic series Valérian and Laureline is as eye-popping and jaw-dropping as his previous films The Fifth Element and Lucy but the shoddy script sends the space opera into a black hole.

With an estimated budget of €197.47 million, Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets has won the title of the most expensive movie ever to come out of a non-US studio, but there are many elements of the production that feel like they were picked up in the bargain basement. Read our full review here.

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Maudie *** 

Song for Raggy Boy director Aisling Walsh has painted her own portrait of Canadian folk artist Maude Lewis with this captivating and honest film. Lewis, who was near crippled with arthritis, painstakingly created childlike and joyful paintings of the nature and activities in and around her native Nova Scotia in the 1930s to 1970s and her work won her national fame.

She is played by Sally Hawkins in possibly the best role of her quietly brilliant career. Hawkins really does inhabit Maudie’s persona - from impish young woman to stooped old lady - and she commands every scene with a frail but indomitable spirit. Read our full review

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The Big Sick ****1/2
The Big Sick sees Silicon Valley's Kumail Nanjiani and co-writer Emily V Gordon bringing their own love lives to the big screen. This is emotional pinball - with your heart as the plunger.

We're aways off awards season, but it would be an awful pity if The Big Sick wasn't at the business end of things at the start of 2018. A Best Original Screenplay Oscar nomination would be thoroughly deserved, and there's an argument to be made for spots on the acting shortlists too. Every performance here feels as real deal as the relationships and recounting of events. Read our full review here.

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Captain Underpants ****
This manic superhero caper (sorry) induces a sugar rush regardless of whether you've bought any of the white gear in the foyer. At a third of the length, it's three times more entertaining than Suicide Squad and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice combined. But be warned: the five-year-olds you've brought as cover may decide that they can't take you anywhere and sit somewhere else.

From the get-go here there's no let up in terms of quality gags or mischief with the villain summing up proceedings as "completely implausible, juvenile and filled with the lowest form of wit: potty humour". Go on with his bad self - this movie plays like Ferris Bueller in fourth class and even includes Yello's Oh Yeah by way of a tribute. Chicka, chicka! Read our full review here.

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Girls Trip ***1/2
Centred on four best friends (Regina Hall, Queen Latifah, Jada Pinkett Smith, Tiffany Haddish) that have drifted apart for the various reasons friendships do - life, careers, family, old rifts that were never mended - Girls Trip is all about their big reunion for a wild weekend in New Orleans. It's a tried-and-tested premise that has never worked so well.

While the women each fit a stereotype and clichés abound, it never feels stale and it's refreshing to see a film that shows the immature side to women in the way so many buddy comedies do with male friendships, without taking away from their femininity. Read our full review here.

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47 Metres Down *
Other Side of the Door and Storage 24 director Johannes Roberts sets the scene with captivating underwater visuals that promise much, but he fails to deliver an adventure of substance.

Claire Holt is the only actor who seems to know how to act like she is frightened in this shark cage thriller and also has a more varied portfolio to handle the different phases of fear. From the moment Mandy Moore comes aboard you just want her character to be eaten by a shark. Read our full review here.

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