You're spoilt for choice: the Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep-starring The Post, animated delight Coco and Liam Neeson's new action-thriller The Commuter all open in cinemas this weekend. 

The Post ****1/2
Now this is the business. Not only does The Post boast some serious Hollywood royalty – director Steven Spielberg, actors Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep – it also heaves with one of the greatest ensemble casts in cinema history.

It would be more surprising if it wasn’t a cracker. But it is.

And although it’s based on a true story set in the early 1970s, it also has a strong modern resonance as the behaviour of then US President Richard Nixon isn’t too dissimilar to the carry-on of the current incumbent. Read our full review here.

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The Commuter **1/2
Four months on from telling journalists that, at 65, he was a geriatric for the action genre, the Free Travel-approaching Liam Neeson acquits himself with goer gusto in The Commuter. It's his fourth film with director Jaume Collet-Serra after Unknown, Non-Stop and Run All Night, and while he keeps his side of the beat-em-up bargain, he deserved a better vehicle for his talents than this train-set thriller.

Playing like Rebirth of a SalesmanThe Commuter sees Neeson's insurance hawker arriving at the stop named P45 and then getting an offer he can't refuse from another passenger (Vera Farmiga - underused like Elizabeth McGovern and Sam Neill) on the train back home. Every man, as they say, has his thumbscrew, and Farmiga's mystery woman twists good-o in this movie, a whoisit rather than a whodunit. Read our full review here.

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Coco ****
Pixar’s latest offering Coco is a breath of fresh air in the animated movie universe.

This intricately detailed, highly imaginative and endlessly enthralling film manages to achieve the seemingly impossible – to make a joyous and hopeful film that has death as a central theme.

Our hero is Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez), a bright, ambitious 12-year-old boy who lives in a bustling home in a small town in Mexico along with his multi-generational family who run a shoe empire built by his great-great-grandmother. Read our full review here.

Still Showing:

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri *****
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri will make you feel deeply, laugh loudly and think hard, often in the space of one scene. It is a triumph and sees writer and director Martin McDonagh at his absolute best.

The story centres on Mildred Hayes (Frances McDormand), a woman whose daughter was raped and murdered seven months ago, with the police department's case now cold. Renting three billboards on a back road into her hometown of Ebbing, Missouri, Mildred decides to call local law enforcement out on the lack of progress.

Despite the gravity of the subject matter, there are more laughs to be had here than in most traditional comedies; McDonagh's balancing act of dark humour and real human emotion pays off yet again, in a film that is geographically far removed from In Bruges, but shares much of its sensibility. Read our full review here.

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Darkest Hour *****
In a career already filled with great performances - The Firm (TV), State of Grace, Dracula, True Romance, The Contender - Gary Oldman has arguably saved the best until now. 

As Winston Churchill in Atonement director Joe Wright's relentlessly gripping, race-against-time biopic, Oldman does that rare thing: makes you think he's the first and last to ever play the British wartime leader. 

With Kristin Scott Thomas as wife Clementine, Ben Mendelsohn as King George VI and Lily James as just-hired secretary Elizabeth Layton, Darkest Hour has just as much for fans of The Crown as lovers of The Cruel Sea. Read our full review here.

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Eric Clapton: Life in 12 Bars *****
Eric Clapton would become one of the world's greatest blues guitarists. Yet all the success in the world could not take away profound personal insecurity and an inability to trust for much of his life, as this masterful film carefully documents.

The narrative structure is essentially the same as that employed by the four-part Frank Sinatra series, All or Nothing at All. So you get EC mostly heard in voiceover talking candidly about his life, or seen in old footage, a careful, reflective, intelligent interviewee. 

Like the Sinatra series, there are no talking heads - that cheap standby - nobody gushing about Clapton, nobody enthusing vacuously. In fact, nobody talks nonsense of any kind throughout the entire film except Clapton, when drunk or unhinged by pot, Mandrax, LSD, mescalin or heroin. Read our full review here.

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