Reports of Liam Neeson's action hero demise were greatly exaggerated - by the man himself. 

Four months on from telling journalists that, at 65, he was a geriatric for the genre, the Free Travel-approaching Neeson acquits himself with goer gusto in The Commuter. It's his fourth film with director Jaume Collet-Serra after Unknown, Non-Stop and Run All Night, and while he keeps his side of the beat-em-up bargain, he deserved a better vehicle for his talents than this train-set thriller.

Strangers on a train...

Playing like Rebirth of a Salesman, The Commuter sees Neeson's insurance hawker arriving at the stop named P45 and then getting an offer he can't refuse from another passenger (Vera Farmiga - underused like Elizabeth McGovern and Sam Neill) on the train back home. Every man, as they say, has his thumbscrew, and Farmiga's mystery woman twists good-o in this movie, a whoisit rather than a whodunit.

The offer he can't refuse...

The first half is great fun, with Neeson gravelling and growling his way through every line as only he can. Yes, he's on the phone; yes, he looks great with a manbag and yes, it's not long before his crisp Oxford is only fit for the bin. In a nice bit of Die Irish casting, Killian Scott is among those to receive a larruping. Reckon he's still sounding the reverse alarm whenever he goes to sit in a chair...

Liam Neeson and Killian Scott get to grips with their scene

But for all the style and slickness, The Commuter literally goes off the rails and ends up feeling too close to the man-in-a-box trip we took aboard Non-Stop's doomed Transatlantic flight. Like that movie, the CGI during the big finale is silly. 

Yes, he's on the phone; yes, he looks great with a manbag and yes, it's not long before his crisp Oxford is only fit for the bin

Neeson and Collet-Serra are planning a fifth film together. After this, they need to make sure we're all in first class.