Lots to savour in cinemas this weekend.

The Invisible Man ****

After The Mummy reboot under performed at the box office in 2017 leaving Universal Pictures' Dark Universe series hanging in the balance, Blumhouse Productions stepped in to revive the Monsterverse and change tack with The Invisible Man.

Writer/director Leigh Whannell's (Saw, Insidious), cleverly produced reimagining of HG Wells's sci-fi novel, along with the original 1933 big screen classic, is a painfully relevant and unsettling mind-bender that deserves your presence.

From its opening frames, the film digs its claws in and doesn’t let go as Cecilia Kass (Elisabeth Moss) finally escapes the grasps of her controlling partner (Oliver Jackson-Cohen), a famous optics pioneer. Ever the manipulator, he fakes his own death, and uses his presence (or lack of) to continue his menacing ways.

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This socially-aware piece of cinema paints an immensely unnerving portrait of a woman in the clutches of a volatile relationship that becomes even more sinister when her abuser is no longer visible to the naked eye. Read our full review here.

Dark Waters ****

Somewhat a labour of love for leading man, producer and noted environmentalist Mark Ruffalo, Dark Waters tells the compelling true story of how a meek corporate lawyer switched from defending his rapacious clients to investigating them in one of the most protracted and disturbing legal cases in American history.

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Based on a New York Times magazine article by Nathaniel Rich, Ruffalo plays Rob Bilott, a mild-mannered and dedicated attorney in a prestigious Cincinnati law firm in the late 1990s who is making his way up the corporate ladder until he is alerted to some truly shocking ecological crimes in his rural hometown. Read full review here 

Portrait of a Lady on Fire ****
Portrait of a Lady on Fire is a cool, almost ascetic work exploring sexual repression and sexual longing - sides perhaps of the same 18th-Century French coin - between two young women, an artist and her portrait subject.

There is a sense of layers of the past and connections with bygone years toppling on to the present, that repeated motif of portraiture and perception, of desire freed from its shackles in the context of a deeply-founded family story.

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There are some absorbing, delicately-measured scenes depicting the growing relationship between painter and her sitter. Read our full review here.

Downhill ****
This thought-provoking remake of Ruben Östlund's 2014 Swedish-language film Force Majeure deftly juggles dark passages with oddly comic counterbalance.

It's an interesting one, this clever, dark exercise. In the original movie, a father and husband in fight-or-flight mode opts for flight as a so-called 'controlled’ avalanche over-spills onto an Alpine ski resort. He runs or walks quickly away from the incident.

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The same drama is enacted in the remake, with the mother Billie played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Will Ferrell as the father Pete. Read our full review here.

Color Out of Space ****
Four decades into his career, Nicolas Cage is still mad for the work, and out the door with it. Indeed, it's at the stage where if you were given good odds on him making a cameo in Fair City (as himself popping into McCoy's for soup and a sandwich on the way to the Airport, or channelling his self-described "nouveau shamanic" acting style as a blow-in on the Northside), take them because, as Color Out of Space proves, stranger things have happened. Its director, Richard Stanley, is back in business and making his first dramatic feature after 25 years away.

Adapted from a HP Lovecraft story, Color Out of Space gives film fans what they never knew they needed: Cage as alpaca farmer Nathan Gardner.

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Living the escape-from-the-city dream with wife Theresa (Joely Richardson) and their three children, Nathan and co receive an uninvited guest in the form of "a boom like a sonic boom and a big flash like a pink light". Read our full review here.

Still Showing:

Greed ***
Following star turns as music mogul Tony Wilson in 24-Hour Party People, legendary TV misfit Alan Partridge, and pornographer Paul Raymond in The Look of Love, Steve Coogan plays another rampant egotist in this helter skelter ride of a movie with his frequent collaborator Michael Winterbottom.

Coogan plays Sir Richard McCreadie, Rich for short and "Greedy McCreadie" to his many enemies. He's the son of Irish emigrants, who has risen through the ranks of the London rag trade to become the billionaire self-styled "king of the high street". All ultra bright veneers, perma tan and trophy wife, he has it all, except maybe human decency and a sense of his own limitations.

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His gilded existence begins to crumble when the ghosts of his past come to circle and plot and he is forced to face a public inquiry into his flagrantly unethical business dealings. To save the McCreadie "brand" and to show off to his celebrity friends, he plans an extravagant party on a Greek island to mark his 60th birthday, based on his favourite movie Gladiator - complete with Roman amphitheatre. Read our full review here.

The Call of the Wild ****
This fascinating adaptation of Jack London's classic 1903 novel, set in Canadian Yukon territory in the 1890s, is a must-see.

Harrison Ford, at 77, is the perfect fit for John Thornton, the disenchanted loner who is lamenting the death of his young son and the subsequent end of his marriage. Thornton is living in a remote cabin, drinking too much whiskey and feeling desperately sorry for himself.

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Ultimately, canine hero Buck and Thornton rescue each other from neglect and despair and look out for each other thereafter. But there are many turns on the snowy, tree-lined path and many twists in the tale. Thankfully the visual effects and animation technology do not ruin the organic, wholesome spirit of the film. Read our full review here.

Like a Boss *1/2
It wants to be a raunchy, slapstick satire about female empowerment and entrepreneurship, with a shiny message about the bonds of adult friendship, but Like a Boss is an overworked mess.

Mia and Mel (Tiffany Haddish and Rose Byrne) are inseparable BFFs 'living their best life' as CEOs of a small self-made beauty company in Atlanta. As their financial troubles surface (they are nearly $500,000 in debt), a too-good-to-be-true buyout arises in the form of cartoonish villain Claire Luna (Salma Hayek), putting their friendship to the test.

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Writing partners Sam Pitman and Adam Cole-Kelly's promising screenplay demotes itself into vacuous territory early on, leaving director Miguel Arteta's (The Good Girl, Youth in Revolt) setup with no choice but to become another chaotic affair of Hollywood déjà vu. Read our full review here.