Planning a cinema trip this weekend? Here's the lowdown on which new releases are worth your ticket fare!

Battle of the Sexes ****

Little Miss Sunshine directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris didn't receive the love they deserved at the US box office for Battle of the Sexes - the story of equality icon Billie Jean King and self-proclaimed "male chauvinist pig" Bobby Riggs' $100,000 tennis match in 1973. Surely the smart money should have been on releasing the film across the Atlantic now, in awards season, rather than back in September?

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Here's what plenty of American audiences missed: great performances by Emma Stone and Steve Carell as the trailblazer and showman respectively; the classiest of supporting casts; a story that works on both sides of the net as either a comedy or drama; and an era so expertly recreated that a bottle of Robinson's Diluted Orange should be the tipple of choice while viewing. Like the best players, the film just flows. And like the best games, it should have been longer... Read our full review here.

Daddy's Home 2 **1/2

Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell are back with a follow-up to 2015's Daddy's Home and while there are laughs and Christmas cheer to be had, it's never more than ok.

All seems to be going well in the world of co-fathering for Dusty (Wahlberg) and Brad (Will) this outing, but when their own dads come to town for a big 'together Christmas' the cracks begin to show and hilarity should ensue, but doesn't quite.

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The casting of Gibson as Wahlberg's dad and Lithgow as Ferrell's is excellent but their combined star power only does so much, with just a handful of really funny gags over the course of the 100 minute run time... Read our full review here.

Suburbicon ***

The pretty pastels and primary colours of a Norman Rockwell painting turn to the darker shades of Edward Hopper in this entertaining but perplexing story.

George Clooney gets behind the lens again for a curious and lopsided tale of everyday murder and racism in the suburban American of the late fifties.

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Our setting is the Everytown of Suburbicon, a place of proto Stepford wives, clean-cut family men, towheaded boys and pretty girls. It’s a world of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, ray gun TV remote controls and, like those perfect picket fences that surround the manicured lawns, everyone is glaringly white... Read our full review here.

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Justice League ***1/2

It's certainly fair to say that DC has been less successful with movie adaptations of its superheroes compared to its comic rival, Marvel. In recent years, only the Wonder Woman film has been given a general thumbs-up; Suicide Squad was okay-ish, while Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice was as bad as Ireland's performance against Denmark.

That said, old-school action yarn Justice League should satisfy ten-year-old comic book fans of all ages... Read our full review here.

Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool *****

How's this for good going? Turns out that the best title this year is on one of the best films. 

Just when it seemed like the honour roll of 2017's great love stories was complete with the release of Call Me by Your Name, along come Annette Bening and Jamie Bell to demand their spot with Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool. As screen chemistry goes, they've cooked up the strongest of stuff with this true story... Read our full review here.

Good Time ****

From The Rover to Maps to the Stars to Life, Robert Pattinson's post-Twilight career has shown him to be an actor keen to get his teeth into offbeat, character-driven work and stay largely below the multiplex radar.

He continues on that noble path with Good Time, a low-budget crime drama determined to wring the most out of its 'one crazy night' set-up.

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Cast here as possibly America's dumbest criminal (certainly New York's, anyway), Pattinson's Connie Nikas is trying to pick up the pieces of a heist that went wrong. It's an odyssey that takes him across the city with viewers in the (bad) company of an agent of his own doom whose quick thinking is getting him nowhere fast... Read our full review here.

Paddington 2 *****

Three years on from reversing the ageing process on generations worldwide and inspiring a new audience with his first big screen adventure, Windsor Gardens' most famous resident has returned to work his ursine magic once again and leave people in better shape than he found them.

His brand of slapstick and sweetness remains just as addictive as those sandwiches he keeps about his person - you joining in the fun is a match marmalade in Heaven... Read our full review here.

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