Warning: This story contains disturbing images

The body of a drowned toddler washed up on the beach in one of Turkey's prime tourist resorts after at least 12 presumed Syrian refugees died trying to reach the Greek island of Kos, sparking horrified reactions on social media.

Pictures from the scene showed a little boy wearing a bright red t-shirt and shorts lying face-down in the surf on a beach near the resort town of Bodrum. A grim-faced policeman then carries the body away.

Turkish media identified the boy as three-year-old Aylan Kurdi, whose five-year-old brother died on the same boat.

Media reports said he was from the north Syrian town of Kobani near the Turkish border, scene of heavy fighting between Islamic State insurgents and Kurdish regional forces a few months ago.

The hashtag "KiyiyaVuranInsanlik" - "humanity washed ashore" - became the top trending topic on Twitter.

In the first few hours after the accident, the image had been retweeted thousands of times.

Warning: What follows below is an image that some people may find disturbing - NOT SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN

The two boats, carrying a total of 23 people, had set off separately from the Akyarlar area of the Bodrum peninsula, a senior Turkish naval official said.

The confirmed dead included five children and one woman. Seven people were rescued and two reached the shore in lifejackets.

The official said hopes were fading of saving the two people still missing.

The army said its search and rescue teams had saved hundreds of migrants in the seas between Turkey and Greek islands over the last few days.

Over the last week there has been a dramatic spike in the numbers of migrants, mainly from Syria, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Africa, seeking to leave Turkey by sea for Greece in the hope of finding new lives in the European Union.

The Turkish government said this week that the coastguard had rescued over 42,000 migrants in the Aegean Sea in the first five months of 2015 and more than 2,160 in the last week alone.

A coastguard official told AFP around 100 people had been rescued by Turkish rescue teams overnight as they tried to reach the island of Kos.

The United Nations refugee agency UNHCR said more than 2,500 people have died trying to cross the Mediterranean so far this year. 

Migrants, many of whom have paid over $1,000 to smugglers for the risky passage, are taking advantage of the calm summer weather which makes this the best time for the crossing.

Meanwhile, hundreds of people staged a demonstration outside Budapest's main international train station, as police blocked some 2,000 people from boarding trains to Austria and Germany.

Around 600 men, women and children, mostly from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, were sitting or standing outside the Keleti station, while around 1,200 were downstairs in a so-called "transit zone".

Around 100 migrants arriving from a registration centre near the border with Serbia were sitting on the platform at a suburban train station, refusing to board a train to the Debrecen refugee camp.

Police said in a statement that the group "demanded to be allowed to travel on to Germany ... police have taken the necessary security steps to ensure that train traffic is undisturbed."

Hungary, which saw 50,000 migrants and asylum seekers enter the country in August alone, this week allowed thousands to board trains to Austria and Germany but in a U-turn yesterday police blocked access to the station for anyone without an EU visa.

Only around 150 migrants arrived in Vienna by train from Budapest yesterday afternoon, police said. On Monday a record 3,650 arrived.

The Hungarian government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban, which has built a razor-wire barrier along its 175km border with Serbia, said that it was applying EU rules.

"Normal people, abnormal people, educated, uneducated, doctors, engineers, any people, we're staying here. Until we go by train to Germany," said one Syrian man protesting at the station.

"And this is what we will be doing (protesting) for the next day, for the next month, for the next year and for our whole life. We need our rights... It's not our dream to stay here and to sleep in the streets."

Around 600 men, women and children, mostly from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, were sitting or standing outside the Keleti station, while around 1,200 were downstairs in a so-called "transit zone".

Meanwhile, around 100 migrants arriving from a registration centre near the border with Serbia were sitting on the platform at a suburban train station, refusing to board a train to the Debrecen refugee camp.

Police said in a statement that the group "demanded to be allowed to travel on to Germany...police have taken the necessary security steps to ensure that train traffic is undisturbed."

Hungary, which saw 50,000 migrants and asylum seekers enter the country in August alone, this week allowed thousands to board trains to Austria and Germany but in a U-turn yesterday police blocked access to the station for anyone without an EU visa.

Only around 150 migrants arrived in Vienna by train from Budapest yesterday afternoon, police said. On Monday a record 3,650 arrived.

The Hungarian government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban, which has built a razor-wire barrier along its 175km border with Serbia, said that it was applying EU rules.

Hungary's razor-wire barrier is proving ineffective in keeping out the tens of thousands of people trekking up from Greece through the western Balkans, with Hungarian authorities saying that 2,284 crossed yesterday including 353 children.

100 migrants per hour arriving in Germany

More than 100 migrants an hour arrived in Germany today, amid a record influx travelling on packed trains to the southern city of Munich, police said.

An average of 109 illegal entries per hour were registered between midnight and 6am local time nationwide, said federal police.

The national total for yesterday was 3,709, more than twice the daily average of recent weeks, with most arriving in Munich by rail from Hungary via Austria.

Of the day's entries without valid visas, 3,170 were in the police district that covers Munich and areas close to the Austrian border, said spokesman Gero von Vegesack.

Germany has become the top EU destination for refugees and migrants fleeing conflict and misery.

So far this year, German police have recorded over 125,000 illegal entries, more than double last year's total of about 57,000, and sharply up from around 26,000 in 2013.

Last year the highest number of recorded illegal entries to Germany came from Syria, followed by Eritrea, Afghanistan, Kosovo and Serbia.

Italy ready to impose border controls

Italy is ready to impose identification checks at Brennero on the border with Austria after receiving a request from Germany for help in easing the flow of migrants into Bavaria, the northern province of Bolzano said.

Rome was ready to "reactivate" controls just as it did for the G7 in June, as "a temporary measure to allow Bavaria to reorganise and face the emergency", a statement from the province said.

Bolzano, in the German-speaking Alto Adige region in northern Italy, said Bavaria had asked for "logistical support".

The region will also take in "between 300 and 400 refugees", housing them temporarily in a number of gyms already equipped for such use, under the organisation of the civil protection agency, and at the cost of the state.

"Bavaria is witnessing record arrivals of refugees, mainly via the Balkan route, which is creating an unmanageable situation," the province said, adding that efforts were underway "to find new structures and cope immediately with the exponential growth in the number of migrants".

Hundreds of migrants on tracks at Calais block trains to UK

Hundreds of migrants poured overnight onto the high-speed railway linking Paris with London near the French port of Calais, a police source said today, stranding thousands of passengers aboard Eurostar trains for hours.

The migrants took to the tracks around Calais-Frethun station, the latest target for those trying to reach Britain,forcing French rail operator SNCF to halt services near the entrance to the Channel Tunnel.

About 3,000 to 4,000 migrants from the Middle East, Asia and Africa live in camps around Calais, dodging police as they try to get aboard trains and trucks heading for Britain through the tunnel or on car ferries.

Five Eurostar high-speed trains were blocked for hours and passengers in one were asked to listen out for any sounds of migrants climbing onto the carriage roofs.

Many sat in dark,stifling trains after SNCF had to shut down the power supply.

A spokeswoman for Eurotunnel said that as security is tightened at Calais port and the Channel Tunnel entrance, the migrants are looking for new entry points such as Calais-Frethun.

The station lies about 5km inland, just outside the zone controlled by Eurotunnel.

The tunnel operator also said it would share know-how withSNCF, which is to erect 13 km (8 miles) of security fencing along the rail network.