Suarez at centre of new biting controversy

Wednesday 25 June 2014 11.05
1 of 5
Luis Suarez and Giorgio Chiellini react after the incident
Luis Suarez and Giorgio Chiellini react after the incident
Giorgio Chiellini showed the mark on his shoulder to the referee
Giorgio Chiellini showed the mark on his shoulder to the referee
Uruguay's midfielder Gaston Ramirez  checks Chiellini's shoulder
Uruguay's midfielder Gaston Ramirez checks Chiellini's shoulder
Suarez and Chiellini react after the clash
Suarez and Chiellini react after the clash
Suarez checks his teeth following his clash with Chiellini
Suarez checks his teeth following his clash with Chiellini

Uruguay striker Luis Suarez is at the centre of another biting storm after appearing to sink his teeth into the shoulder of Italy defender Giorgio Chiellini during the teams' decisive World Cup Group D game.

Ten minutes from the end of the match, Suarez and Chiellini clashed in the Italian penalty area and the furious Italian pulled open his shirt to show the mark to the referee.

Photographs show what appeared to be bite marks on Cheillini's left shoulder.

The Italians were still complaining about the incident when Uruguay captain Diego Godin scored with an 81st-minute header.

The goal secured a 1-0 win for Uruguay, enough to send them through to the second round,  eliminating Italy in the process.

"It was ridiculous not to send Suarez off," Chiellini told Rai TV.

"It is clear, clear-cut and then there was the obvious dive afterwards because he knew very well that he did something that he shouldn't have done."

Suarez was banned for ten games last year after biting Chelsea's Branislav Ivanovic in a Premier League game.

In 2010, he was suspended for seven games for biting PSV Eindhoven's Otman Bakkal while playing for Ajax Amsterdam.      

Analysis: Did Luis Suarez bite?

Uruguay has a major soft spot for the controversial Suarez.
              
He grew up in a poor family in the north-western city of Salto, where he looked after parked cars to help support his siblings after his parents split up.
              
He is arguably the world's most famous Uruguayan, along with president Jose Mujica.
              
Some Uruguayans are downplaying - or denying - the biting of Chiellini's shoulder altogether.
              
"There was no bite, that's what the press says to kill Suarez," said Pablo Dilan, a 38-year-old print shop worker.
              
"Suarez's mouth slips again," joked leading Uruguayan newspaper El Pais.
              
That's a far cry from the reaction Suarez's infamous gnashing and apparent racist abuse have inspired outside Uruguay, where many are outraged that he appears to have done it again.

FIFA is investigating the incident.
              
Some Uruguayans, however, are furious.
              
"This kid can't control his biting and attacking issues," said Luis Lara, a 52-year-old shopkeeper. "That makes all of us Uruguayans look bad."
              
But fans are worried Suarez may be banned from the rest of the tournament. He has already twice been suspended from club soccer for biting.
              
"We couldn't believe he was doing it again," said Juan Santestevan, a 33-year-old web worker.
              
"It's a problem for all of us if they ban him... I don't think he deserves a ban because the other guy also elbowed him. Suarez gets out of control when things don't work out for him, but that's no worse than the kicks they gave him."