Leonard Cohen documentary Marianne and Leonard: Words of Love is a must-see this week, with Horrible Histories: The Movie also hitting the big screen.

Horrible Histories: The Movie - Rotten Romans ***

Like a PG-rated multi-chariot pile-up between Monty Python, Mel Brooks, Carry On, and Blackadder, the rather excellent BBC history series for kids finally makes its big screen debut.

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Horrible Histories takes a humorous spin on the great stories of the ages and like the science on The Big Bang Theory, the facts are always true or as true as they can be. However, unlike The Big Bang Theory, Horrible Histories is actually funny.

For this movie debut (expect more films in the series) we set our scene in Roman Britain in 60AD, just as Celtic queen Boudicca is about to rebel against Nero's occupying forces. Read our full review here.

Marianne and Leonard: Words of Love ****

For the uninitiated - yes, they are out there - one of Leonard Cohen's best-known songs is So Long, Marianne, addressed to Marianne Ihlen, the woman with whom he maintained an on-off relationship throughout his life, after they met on the Greek island of Hydra in 1960.

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In Nick Broomfield's engaging documentary, we learn that the song's chorus originally began "Come on, Marianne", rather than "So long, Marianne". That makes a lot more sense: "Come on, Marianne" is a rallying cry - pick up the pieces, try again.

Broomfield also spent some time on Hydra, years after Cohen departed, and he became Marianne's lover for a spell. Marianne and Leonard: Words of Love is the filmmaker's story too. Read our full review here. 

Still Showing:

The Lion King ***1/2

It's hard to figure out who is the bravest here: monarch-in-waiting Simba for standing up to his murderous uncle Scar, or director Jon Favreau for trying to bring together the generations all over again by taking on a touchstone tale that has spent 25 years in people's lives. 

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Right now, we're calling it a draw.

Even with a cast including Donald Glover (Simba), Beyoncé (Nala), Chiwetel Ejiofor (Scar), Seth Rogen (Pumbaa) and original Lion King star James Earl Jones (reprising his role as father-for-the-ages Musafa), Favreau was always going to have his work cut out with his bid to equal or better Disney's 1994 odyssey of innocence and experience. Remaking The Jungle Book was one thing, but this is a completely different walk on the wild side. Simply put, people don't have the same emotional attachment to Mowgli, Baloo and co as the characters mentioned above. When it comes to paws to fill, you can't get any bigger than Simba's. Read our full review here.

Tell It to the Bees *1/2

Director Annabel Jankel should have taken the kitchen sink out of Tell It to the Bees, because all the pots and pans have been truly thrown at it. 

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What might have been, in more capable hands, an indie gem is instead a melodramatic TV movie.

The setting is a dour Scottish town in the 1950s, where everybody watches everybody else. Lydia (Holliday Grainger), a blow-in from the Manchester area, had her son Charlie (Gregor Selkirk) before she married his father, a local man named Robert Weekes (Emun Elliott). Read our full review here.