The Irish clerical abuse survivor, Marie Collins, has called on Pope Francis to call Chilean bishops to account after he accused some of them of misleading him on his 2015 appointment of Bishop Juan Barros in spite of abuse victims' accusations that he had covered up for a paedophile priest.

Speaking to RTÉ News, Marie Collins, who resigned last year from the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors also urged the pontiff to promote the prelate he tasked with investigating the scandal to ensure delivery on his promises on child protection. 

Ms Collins said Archbishop Charles Scicluna, who from 2002 until 2012 served as the Vatican's chief prosecutor of clergy who abuse minors, should now be tasked with fully implementing the pope's promise to prioritise victims ahead of the clericalist elite she has accused of frustrating the Commission's work.

She was commenting on the acknowledgement by Pope Francis that he made "grave mistakes" when he dismissed as calumny allegations by a paedophile priest's victims that the then Father Barros had covered up for the abuser.

Dr Barros was a longstanding friend of Father Fernando Karadima, one of Chile's best-connected clerics who the Vatican found guilty in 2011 of abusing several children.

Commenting on Dr Scicluna's 2,800 page report on the investigation, the pontiff told the Chilean hierarchy he felt ashamed and that he had been misled on the scandal. 

Popes generally consult intensively with the bishops of a country about controversial promotions to their ranks. 

Last night, the Chilean bishops' spokesman read the papal letter to journalists in the coastal town of Punta de Tracla. The Argentine pope said he was inviting victims of Father Karadima to Rome to personally seek their forgiveness.

He blamed  his errors on a lack of "truthful and balanced information" and summoned the country's entire hierarchy to a meeting in the Vatican to discuss the controversial appointment of Bishop Juan Barros.

Pope Benedict issued a similar order to the Irish hierarchy in the wake of the government-commissioned Ryan and Murphy reports on abuse in church-run children's residential institutions and of clerical sexual in the Dublin Archdiocese.

During the pope's visit to Chile last January, he told reporters there was not a single piece of evidence against Dr Barros and that all the accusations were slanderous.

On his return to Rome, he ordered Archbishop Scicluna to review the allegations.

Last night's papal about-turn on foot of the Maltese prelate's report was welcomed by Marie Collins in a morning tweet.

She singled out for praise three spokesmen for Karadima's victims including Juan Carlos Cruz.

During her term on the Pontifical Commission Ms Collins had failed to persuade the Vatican to appoint Mr Cruz to the pope's advisory body.

In today's interview with RTÉ News, she urged  Pope Francis to consult Mr Cruz on the Catholic Church's treatment of abuse victims and survivors.

Ms Collins' tweet ended: "They told the truth but the pope accused them of "calumny" based on the word of his clerical colleagues. Archbishop Scicluna did an excellent job with his investigation." 

Pope Francis has acknowledged that he made "grave mistakes" in the handling of a sexual abuse crisis in Chile, saying he felt shame, and inviting victims he had once doubted, to Rome to personally seek their forgiveness.

In letter to the Chilean hierarchy he blamed his errors on a lack of "truthful and balanced information".

The climbdown follows a visit to Chile by one of the Vatican's most experienced sexual abuse investigators, Archbishop Charles Scicluna, who investigated claims that Bishop Juan Barros, who was appointed by the pope in 2015, had covered up sexual abuse of minors by his mentor Father Fernando Karadima.

During the Pope's visit to Chile last January, he told reporters there was not a single piece of evidence against Barros and that all the accusations were slanderous.

The Pope's about-turn has been welcomed by the Irish child abuse survivor, Marie Collins, who resigned last year from the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors alleging that the Vatican bureaucracy was obstructing its work.

This morning she tweeted: "Vindication at last" for Barros' accusers, including Juan Carlos Cruz who she had failed to persuade the Vatican to appoint to the Commission.

"They told the truth but the Pope accused them of "calumny" based on the word of his clerical colleagues.  Archbishop Scicluna did an excellent job with his investigation," Ms Collins added.