Rory O'Connell says "I love when the blood oranges arrive. In this part of the world it is generally late January, just the time when we need a little cheering up. They have a wonderful flavour and the beautiful ruby coloured flesh and juice is just a joy. I use them in sweet and savoury situations and will be seen in this coldest of months trying to find a few brave shoots of watercress to pair them in what is one of my favourite savoury salads of the year. In this jelly I pair them with our regular oranges, also good at this time of year, to temper the sometimes sharp flavour of the sanguine variety. The jelly can be set in individual moulds, coffee cups or glasses. It can also be set in a large dish and served straight from that. If you want to turn out the jellies for a smart presentation, you need to brush your moulds with a non-scented oil such as sunflower to ensure they will slide out easily."

Ingredients

 

  • 4 blood oranges - the ones i look out for are from sicily and particularly a variety called taracco
  • 2 normal oranges
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 225ml syrup
  • 1 dsp finely chopped mint
  • 1 tsp orange liqueur such as grand marnier
  • 2 tsp gelatine
  • 2 tblsp water
  • For the Sauce:
  • 225ml fresh orange juice
  • 2-4 teaspoons caster sugar
  • 1 tblsp freshly chopped mint

Method

Rory says, "I love when the blood oranges arrive. In this part of the world it is generally late January, just the time when we need a little cheering up. They have a wonderful flavour and the beautiful ruby coloured flesh and juice is just a joy. I use them in sweet and savoury situations and will be seen in this coldest of months trying to find a few brave shoots of watercress to pair them in what is one of my favourite savoury salads of the year."

"In this jelly I pair them with our regular oranges, also good at this time of year, to temper the sometimes sharp flavour of the sanguine variety. The jelly can be set in individual moulds, coffee cups or glasses. It can also be set in a large dish and served straight from that."

"If you want to turn out the jellies for a smart presentation, you need to brush your moulds with a non-scented oil such as sunflower to ensure they will slide out easily."

Method

  1. Grate the zest from the two normal oranges using a micro plane or the finest side or your grater.
  2. Over a bowl to catch any escaping juices, carefully segment all of the oranges including the two you have zested and squeeze any juice remaining on the skins and membranes over the orange segments.
  3. Add the grated zest, lemon juice, syrup, chopped mint and liqueur if using, and mix gently being careful not to break the fruit.
  4. Now strain all of the liquid off the oranges and measure out 300ml. Reserve any surplus liquid for adding to the sauce.
  5. Measure the gelatine into a Pyrex jug or bowl and add the water. Allow to sponge, placing it in the fridge if you wish to speed up this process. This will take no longer than 5 minutes.
  6. Place the sponged gelatine in a saucepan of gently simmering water and allow to dissolve. There is no need to stir the gelatine, it will melt of its own accord.
  7. As soon as the gelatine is completely liquid and clear, remove from the saucepan. Add the measured liquid to the gelatine, stirring as you pour. Add this to the orange segments and gently mix.
  8. Divide between the moulds or into your dish of choice and place in the fridge to set. Allow 4 hours to be certain, but it will sometimes set in 2 hours.
  9. For the sauce, sweeten the orange juice for the sauce to taste with the caster sugar and add the mint. Any surplus syrupy juice from the jellies is a delicious addition to this.
  10. Serve the jellies, turned out of their moulds, if that is your preference, with a little of the sauce.