Tom Cruise owns screens once more this weekend in the mighty Mission: Impossible - Fallout, but if you've younger viewers in tow, then Hotel Transylvania 3 has plenty of family comedy bite.

Mission: Impossible - Fallout ****1/2
The sixth Mission: Impossible movie and probably the best, Fallout is far more than the impressive/obsessive Tom Cruise stunts. For starters, Rogue Nation director/writer Christopher McQuarrie is the first helmer to be asked back, and - remarkably - he's taken the template to an even higher level than his dynamic 2015 debut.

The conflict between personal loyalties and the common good is at the centre of it all, with Henry Cavill joining regulars such as Cruise, Ving Rhames and Simon Pegg as August Winter, a CIA assassin who is embedded with the Impossible Missions Force (IMF) as they endeavour to retrieve some stolen plutonium and, y'know, save the world.

Rebecca Ferguson and Michelle Monaghan reprise their roles as former MI6 agent Ilsa Faust and Ethan Hunt's ex-wife Julia, while Angela Bassett and Vanessa Kirby swell the impressive female presence as CIA director Erika Sloane and the duplicitous Alana AKA The White Widow. Read our full review here.

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Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation ***
Dracula and co. are back for another Transylvanian adventure and the franchise still bubbles with enough colour and silliness to stay afloat for this seaside outing.

Worried that her dad is under too much stress running the hotel, Mavis (Selena Gomez) decides to book Dracula (Adam Sandler) and their entire family on a monster-friendly cruise around the Bermuda Triangle.

While relaxation was the aim of the game, nobody bargained for the love story that was to come when Dracula falls for the ship's captain Erikha (Kathryn Hahn). But the course of true love doesn't run smoothly and all isn't as it seems on board. Read our full review here.

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Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again ***
As with the first Mamma Mia! movie, it's the ABBA songs that are the real stars in this prequel/sequel.

We didn't know where to look while viewing this toppling (Muriel's) wedding cake of a movie. Hugh Skinner playing air guitar on a baguette to Waterloo in a Parisian brasserie, or maybe Diamante diva Cher doing a near operatic 'duet' of Fernando with Andy Garcia (who plays a twinkly-eyed silver fox hotel manager)?

Or maybe the sight and sound of suave old devil Pierce Brosnan hitting peak Nordic melancholia on a Greek island as he half sings/half talks a snippet of S.O.S. during one of Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again's sad counterpoints to the mostly non-stop euphoric fun and double entendres? Read our full review here. 

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Hotel Artemis ***
Screenwriter Drew Pearce makes his directorial debut with Hotel Artemis, a solidly enjoyable if a bit scattered action thriller which sees Jodie Foster returning to the big screen for the first time since 2013's sci-fi Elysium.

Hotel Artemis is also set in a dystopian future, with the action taking place in a crime-torn Los Angeles in the not-too-distant year of 2028. A riot is spreading across the city, sparked by mass protests due to the privatisation of water companies.

While the city falls apart around them, a group of criminals hole up in the Artemis Hotel. Although ramshackle in appearance, with hints of faded grandeur thanks to the stylish Art Deco-tinged interiors, they've paid top dollar to stay at this heavily-fortified, members only establishment. Read our full review here.

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The Apparition ***
Xavier Giannoli's The Apparition tells the tale of a young French woman (Galatéa Bellugi) who claims to have seen the Virgin Mary. A former war reporter (Vincent Lindon) with baggage of his own is recruited by the Vatican to lift the veil on the incident.

The movie doesn't coerce viewers into accepting a belief but it tries to be more ambitious than it actually is. By the time the final rosary comes around, it loses track of its ideas and ends up going astray down an anecdotal path, where bewildering circumstances are never fully resolved.

Those looking for a neat ending tied up with facts and evidence may be disappointed, as the plot stays mum (or in this case nun) on the anomalies and coincidences throughout. Viewers may find themselves praying to Saint Anthony in the hopes of finding the lost script. Read our full review here. 

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