Britain's Prince Philip has died aged 99, Buckingham Palace has announced.

A statement from Buckingham Palace said: "It is with deep sorrow that Her Majesty The Queen has announced the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

"His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle."

He was the longest-serving consort in British history.

Due to Covid-19 restrictions Prince Philip will not have a state funeral nor lie in state, instead his body will lie in rest in Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral in St George’s Chapel.

"This is in line with custom and with His Royal Highness’s wishes", the College of Arms said.

The funeral arrangements have been revised in view of the Covid-19 pandemic, officials said.

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The duke and the queen were married for more than 70 years and Philip dedicated decades of his life to royal duty, serving Britain at the monarch's side.

He officially retired from public engagements in the summer of 2017.

The death of the duke comes in the midst of the worst public health crisis for generations as the UK and countries around the world reel from the devastating impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Philip had returned to Windsor Castle on 16 March to be reunited with Queen Elizabeth after spending a month in hospital - his longest ever stay.

He initially received care for an infection but then underwent heart surgery for a pre-existing condition.

The duke had looked gaunt as he was driven away from King Edward VII's Hospital in central London, having been pushed in a wheelchair to the waiting car.

Philip - father to the Prince of Wales, the Princess Royal, the Duke of York and the Earl of Wessex - was just two months away from his 100th birthday in June.

He spent much of the Covid-19 crisis staying with the queen at Windsor in HMS Bubble - the nickname given to the couple's reduced household of devoted staff during lockdown.

Princess Eugenie, the couple's granddaughter, said Queen Elizabeth and Philip were each other's "rock" and spoke of how difficult it had been for the queen to be without her husband during her Diamond Jubilee events.

"They are the most incredibly supportive couple to each other.

"Grandpa was unfortunately taken ill and for granny to come and do that alone was probably quite testing and I think he is her rock, really, and she is his," she told Sky News.

The couple reached the rare personal milestone of their platinum wedding anniversary on 20 November 2017.

The coronavirus pandemic will have a major impact on the carefully laid plans for the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral.

With restrictions still in place amid the Covid-19 outbreak, the public elements of the final farewell to Queen Elizabeth's consort will not be able to take place in their original form.

Under the earlier arrangements for the coming days, codenamed Forth Bridge, thousands of people would have been expected to flock to London and Windsor.

Hundreds of members of the armed forces would have been called upon to line the streets in honour of the duke, along with thousands of police officers to keep control of crowds and protect the members of the royal family taking part.

Organisers are said to be "desperately anxious" not to stage anything that attracts mass gatherings, one source said.

The duke's funeral is still expected to be televised and held at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle.

The duke, who was vaccinated against coronavirus in January, spent much of 2020 and the start of 2021 at Windsor Castle after moving from the Sandringham estate in Norfolk to stay with the queen ahead of the start of the first lockdown.

World leaders and Commonwealth representatives, as well as foreign royals, former and current politicians and military chiefs would have been among those due to be invited to gather at the funeral, but such arrangements will now be impossible.

Much depends on the guidance issued to the Royal Household from the British government over the next few days.