Working mums such as renowned tennis player Serena Williams have reached out to organisers of the sport for better maternity policies.

Williams, along with other working mums, is hoping that her efforts will result in more tennis players returning to the professional court after they have given birth.

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Williams has recently returned to Wimbledon following the birth of her daughter Alexis Olympia and she is attempting to win back the singles title she won in 2016.

She told The Telegraph: "I really don’t like being away from her. It’s hard."

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Williams is not alone. The Belarusian tennis champion Victoria Azarenka, Tatjana Maria, the German world no. 57 and many others have reportedly complained about trying to juggle motherhood and professional tennis.

Scheduling issues are resulting in them being away from their children for prolonged periods and the result is that they are wracked with guilt.

Another issue is that they believe that their seeded status should be upheld and protected until they return after maternity leave. It seems that both Wimbledon and the US Open are listening as Williams received a seeded position when she returned.

Azarenka, 27, who incidentally was not seeded when she returned from maternity leave, told The Telegraph: "I think it’s an important conversation that has been started.

"We are discussing the rules and how can we be a leader in sports to have the best maternity policy."

On one occasion for the first round, she didn't have a time for her Wimbledon match - which remained "to be announced" before she found out that she wouldn't be finished until 9pm

She told the Guardian at the time that: "It is unusual. You know I had to be here the whole day which, for a new mum, is a little tough."

She added: "Hopefully, I won’t play like this again."

Responding to her comments, Wimbledon organisers said that the match was: "...scheduled as ‘not before 5pm’ on the official order of play, so the competitors have the assurance of knowing their matches won’t be called to court before 5pm and can plan their day around that".

Anyone following the tennis star on Instagram can see that she's never far away from 18-month-old son Leo however, she couldn't bring her son with her on this occasion: "This is way past his bedtime. So I wouldn’t do that to him."

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"I think the tougher balance is, for me, to be able to spend time away from my son", she added.

"I feel guilty if I take 15 minutes for myself to stretch. I’m trying to, you know, run back to him and spend every second with him. The balance I think is the tough one."
 

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Maria, 29, from Germany who is mum to four-year-old Charlotte is supporting the efforts of her fellow working mums, as she also told The Guardian: "I hope it will mean that all the tournaments will have a creche, because in the men’s tournaments we sometimes have one, but in the women’s not. I hope that can change.

"Here [at Wimbledon] the creche is the best. You bring your children, they eat together, they do activities.

"It is the most beautiful thing in the world if you play a match, and after, you go to her and you see [that] to her it doesn’t matter how you play.

"She is always happy. If you win, she is, ‘OK mama, you won a trophy.’ Or if you don’t win, she says, ‘Oh, it doesn’t matter.’ And she also learns how to win and to lose. So that is nice."

She spoke about mixing tennis and motherhood: "I think everybody should do it. It’s really nice.

"I spoke to Victoria over the last days. She also said it is amazing to be back with a child, and it is. It’s nicer to travel with a child, to have time to enjoy as a family outside of the court."

Now they just need more support in the workplace to do what they do best.