Since 2017, Trisha Lewis has been inspiring both herself and the nation with her incredible transformation.

Having approached her 30th birthday in misery, suffering from depression and weighing approximately 170kg, the Limerick woman made the impressive decision to overhaul both her mind and body.

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Documenting her journey online, Trisha built a community founded on positivity, kindness and ambition. Her can-do attitude and authentic approach to weight loss fuelled her success and, before long, she had gained a following of over 200k 'transformers' and had a best-selling book to her name.

By 2020, it seemed like the 33-year-old had the world as her oyster but, behind the scenes, Trisha was struggling.

"The biggest misconception on social media is that you have more knowledge or more willpower," she tells me over the phone.

"The truth is, you don't. I had to have two or three really big resets during the pandemic and I gained two stone in the first year, and then this year I got rid of it. That was bloody hard, I found that harder than the start of my journey."

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A chef by trade, Trisha's industry was brought to a standstill by Covid-19, and she was soon let go from her job as head chef in a Cork restaurant. Between this and the stress of isolating during lockdowns, not to mention a fall that left her bed-ridden with a concussion, Trisha began to really struggle with her mental health.

Like many of us, she began to lose her motivation to work out in lockdown and began to gain some weight, something that trolls on the internet tried to shame her for, flooding her inbox with negative comments and accusing her of having an eating disorder.

The 33-year-old couldn't help but read the messages which, in a strange twist of fate, led her to realise that it was time to ask for help. Trisha started seeing a counsellor where she discovered that she was suffering from a binge eating disorder.

"It was the one area that I hadn't focused on and it was incredibly important for me to do it," she says. "With therapy, I just found that some of my actions finally made sense."

"I don't know if I'll ever be cured but I now have tools that I can use to deal with it. I often thought my problem was weight but the problem was not dealing with myself, not knowing who I was, and not giving myself the best possible chance. I didn't care about myself so the weight was nearly a byproduct."

"Now that I have that information I know I can beat the weight. I will get there, but I need to know that when I come across a pothole, sometimes I'll fall into it but other times I'll know how to get around it."

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Having worked hard to improve her overall health, the Limerick woman says she is back on track and has transformed her struggles into a best-selling book. In Trisha's 21-Day-Reset, Lewis hopes to inspire those who may have struggled during lockdown - or in any time of their life - to find their motivation for health and happiness.

"We're all human, we all fall of the wagon," she says. "The key to my success and my happiness is my ability to move on and start again without beating myself up. With this book, I wanted to share anything that I do that keeps me on track. This is for the transformers and for me, so if things go wrong I can give it a read and know what to do."

"It's about going back to the basics and knowing what makes you feel good," she adds. "Sometimes I need to do the things I don't want to do to get me where I need to go."

"Sometimes the simplest things are the hardest like remembering to drink your water. And to remove the emotion and the guilt and the shame and the fear."

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Stating that there are no 'good' or 'bad' foods ("an apple doesn't wear a halo"), Trisha, insists that in order to find sustainable success in our eating habits, we need to remove our emotions from our food, and stop comparing ourselves to others.

Most importantly, we need to remember that we have the power to reset at any time we choose.

"You don't have to be perfect. Having an extra glass of water, an extra carrot or going on an extra walk is a great start. You don't have to be running marathons to change your life."

Trisha's 21-Day Reset is published by Gill and is available now.

If you have been affected by issues raised in this story, please visit: www.rte.ie/helplines.