Comedian, writer and digital content creator Justine Stafford joined Ryan Tubridy on RTÉ Radio 1 to discuss her diagnosis of Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder. Listen back above.

"I went from 12 stone to six and a half," Justine told Ryan, describing the beginning of her mental health issues. At just 12-years-of age, she had become anorexic*, subscribing herself to a calorie controlled diet and exercise regime of night-time runs and ice cold baths.

Justine had hoped that her extreme weight loss would help her fit in with some of the students who had bullied her over her weight in her first year of secondary school. Of course, her belief was misguided and she was left incredibly ill from the disorder.

"It was still the same. I was invisible, nobody really noticed me and all the work I had put in, it felt like it was for nothing," she explained. "Everything stopped. I think it was everyone's shock at just how drastic things had become, they were afraid to say anything at that point."

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Despite trying to keep her eating disorder a secret, Justine's extreme weight loss was evident to her family who pleaded with her to get help. Eventually, under her parent's orders, she was admitted to St. Patrick's Mental Health Services for treatment.

"The general rule of thumb would be to investigate the reasons why I stopped eating in the first place but because my weight had gotten so low, they kind of had to intervene and force me to eat, to begin with."

"I still didn't want to get better," she continued. "I still thought I was overweight and I felt like everyone was against me, forcing me to gain weight."

In the end, it was the content creator's love for making films, as well as a deep-seated want to make others happy, that spurred her on to eat. However, the real issues had yet to be revealed and her anorexia nervosa soon transitioned to bulimia.

"I could see that people were happy that I was gaining weight, that then encouraged me to eat more because I was making people happy and, at the end of the day, I just wanted to be liked and to fit in. I realised that if I kept eating, people were happy so it developed into bulimia because I wasn't comfortable eating that much food," she explained.

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Eventually, the teenager opened up to her family about her "very secretive illness" but continued to struggle with her eating disorders, particularly during stressful times of her life such as the Leaving Cert.

Despite this, the now 25-year-old went on to study Film and Broadcasting in DIT and landed an internship at a radio station soon after, followed by a job at Joe.ie. Admittedly, it was a surprising career choice considering how stressful and unpredictable freelancing can be but, according to Justine, her job is extremely rewarding.

"It's been creating content and making people happy, laugh, entertained - that's when I'm at my happiest," she told Ryan. 

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Unfortunately, despite seeking and receiving support from counselors at various stages, the Meath woman would go on to deal with further mental health issues and, last year, when faced with multiple stressors, she attempted to take her own life**.

"I thought there was no way of me coming back, I didn't want to try anymore. I had this illness for more years than I hadn't and it was very difficult," she said.

Justine was admitted to hospital where she received further treatment and was eventually diagnosed with Emotionally Unstable Personality Disorder, also known as Borderline Personality Disorder, something that brought an immediate sense of relief to the young woman. 

"This condition described everything I had gone through; severe anxiety, very unstable emotions, difficulty building relationships, a lot of suicidal ideations, and being involved in self-destructive behaviours. When I heard all these things, it made sense to me. It was a relief if anything."

Recently, the comedian decided to share her story online when she posted the above message to her Twitter account. In the above thread, she mentions Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), a type of treatment that can be used to treat a number of mental health conditions. 

"I have received Cognitive Behavioral Therapy which I have found beneficial for managing my symptoms. However, it does require a lot of dedication and commitment to continue practicing the techniques you are taught in CBT and it is tough work.

For more information on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, visit the HSE website.

"I myself have relapsed. I’ve experienced bad bouts with bulimia and that has always disheartened me, but I try not to let it get a hold of me and just move forward. I still struggle maintaining stability in my life be it my relationship with food, work, and relationships.

"But managing the condition is possible and seeking help really is the most important step to finding the right treatment that works for you and can help you gain control of EUPD and focus on the rest of your life," she wrote.

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* For more information visit Bodywhys.ie, phone their helpline on 1890 200 444 or email alex@bodywhys.ie.

**If you are affected by any of the issues raised in this article, you can contact; The Samaritans (phone 116123), or Pieta House (1800247247).

It's important to note that the above story reflects Justine's experience only. For more information on Personality Disorders, visit St Patrick's Mental Health Services' website.