It's the only movie BAFTA award voted for by the public - and usually it's won by one of the locals! Still, we have our fingers crossed for own Ruth Negga.

The last foreign actor to win the Rising Star award was Kristen Stewart in 2010; since then Tom Hardy, Juno Temple and John Boyega have been among those honoured.

It's a great line-up of nominees again this year, but we're expecting a hometown winner on Sunday night in London.

Still, we'll have our fingers crossed that there's an upset and our own Ruth Negga is up on that stage.

Here are the nominees:

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Laia Costa

One of the great word-of-mouth must-sees of 2016 was the mesmerising Berlin-set thriller Victoria, shot in a single take and deserving of repeat viewing. Its star was Laia Costa, who delivered one of those classic breakout performances that have directors scrambling for a sit-down. The German and Spanish equivalents of the Oscars are already on the mantelpiece.

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2017 is shaping up to be quite the year for Barcelona-born Costa. Her new film, the Tinder-themed Newness, has just premiered at Sundance; her Argentine mystery Black Snow looks the business and she's signed up to star opposite Mia Wasikowska in the thriller Piercing and Life Itself, the new relationship drama from This is Us creator Dan Fogelman. In the meantime, if you haven't seen Victoria, stick it up at the top of your watchlist - and there's also plenty of stuff Costa has done in Spain to investigate. Looks like it'll be a while before she's on home ground again.

Lucas Hedges

For many, grief drama Manchester by the Sea will be the film of 2017, and for all the talk about Casey Affleck's Oscar-tipped performance, he's matched scene-for-scene by his young co-star Hedges. Playing just-bereaved teenager Patrick, Hedges' heart-rending performance - lashing out one minute, laughing the next - is so convincing and perfectly weighted that it shines a light of hope for anyone through the fog of loss. He's up for Best Supporting Actor at the Oscars as a result.

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The New Yorker made his screen debut in Dan in Real Life, the 2007 comedy-drama which had his father, What's Eating Gilbert Grape writer-director Peter Hedges, behind the lens. Two Wes Anderson movies (Moonrise Kingdom, The Grand Budapest Hotel), Terry Gilliam's The Zero Theorem and Jason Reitman's Labor Day followed before he arrived at Manchester by the Sea. His next destinations look just as intriguing - and will be of particular interest to Irish audiences. He's starring in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, the new movie from In Bruges' Martin Mc Donagh; and opposite Saoirse Ronan in Greta Gerwig's Lady Bird.

Tom Holland

Takes some amount of screen smarts to pinch a film from under the noses of Robert Downey Jr, Chris Evans and Scarlett Johansson, but that's exactly what Tom Holland did in last year's Captain America: Civil War when he took his bow as Peter Parker/Spider-Man. The Londoner is the third actor to play the superhero in the space of 15 years, and judging by the energy and snarkiness he displayed opposite Downey Jr's Iron Man, he could be the best. We won't have long to find out - Spider-Man: Homecoming hits screens on July 7, with Downey Jr again in the mix.

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Holland's no stranger to pressure that comes with iconic roles, making his West End debut as Billy Elliot aged 12. Since then, his CV has really taken shape with the post-apocalyptic How I Live Now, Tsunami drama The Impossible and the TV adaptation of Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall among his credits. Along with his web-slinging this year we'll also be seeing him opposite Charlie Hunnam in Amazon adventure The Lost City of Z. Right now he's making the electricity biopic The Current War - a bright spark indeed.

Ruth Negga
Granted, it feels strange that someone we've been watching for over a decade in everything from Breakfast on Pluto to Love/Hate should end up as a Rising Star nominee, but when the big screen breakthrough they are being recognised for is a film as special as the true story Loving, then the wait was worth it. And the Oscars are still to come - a night that would be all the poorer if the Irish-Ethiopian star wasn't on the Best Actress shortlist. It's a shame the BAFTAs didn't think the same for their own corresponding category.

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Speaking to RTÉ Entertainment in December, Negga described Loving as "the greatest love story never told". Whether that's the case, she has honoured it with a performance that is all the more powerful because it is so low-key. There's a theory with movie awards that often it's better to be nominated than to win. Whatever happens at the BAFTAs or the Oscars, Ruth Negga's time has come.

Anya Taylor-Joy

Not content with scaring us as part of breakout horror hit The Witch last Spring, Anya Taylor-Joy also had audiences jumping in January as the kidnapped hero in M Night Shyamalan's Split. Best of all, it took a while to realise it was the Miami-born, Argentina and London-raised 20-year-old in both movies - something that bodes well for the future.

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With buzz aplenty from Sundance for her teen-themed thriller Thoroughbred, and farm-based mystery Marrowbone also on the way, Taylor-Joy will be generating more goose bumps in the year ahead. There's also talk of her going the blockbuster route as the mutant Magick in a spin-off from the X-Men movies. Given the anaemia of last year's X-Men: Apocalypse, she's exactly the kind of new blood the franchise needs.