The History Show

    Sunday, 6pm

    DO YOU HAVE A RELATIVE WHO FOUGHT IN GALLIPOLI?

    Close to 15,000 Irishmen fought in Gallipoli during World War I.  Almost 4,000 of these soldiers died.   Three quarters of the fatalities served in the Volunteer 10th (Irish) Division.    This is a staggering fatality rate of almost 27%.

    Do you have an ancestor who fought with the Australian forces at Gallipoli?

    We’d like to include your stories in our special Gallipoli centenary programme in April. Please Email: history@rte.ie

    The History Show Sunday 1 March 2015

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    The History Show

    Bringing the past to life! Discover how our world was shaped, as Myles Dungan and guests explore events ranging from medieval times to the recent past.

     

    Guinness and the War

    Liam Geraghty reports on some of the World War One stories from the Guinness Archive. Deirdre McParland, manager of the archive talks about the exhibition Guinness and the War 1914 - 1918. The exhibition at The Little Museum of Dublin explores the role the Guinness company played in World War One, and records the stories of the employees who served, from Corporal to Private.

    Timothy O'Neill Lane

    Tadhg Mulcahy talks about Timothy O'Neill Lane, the author of "Lane's English-Irish Dictionary", purported to be the first ever English-Irish dictionary published. 

    Belgian Refugees in Kildare

    Lorcan Clancy reports on the work of "The History Squad" at Scoil na Mainistrach, a boy's primary school in Celbridge, County Kildare. They're researching the lives of the Belgian refugees who lived there in the early years of World War One. 

    The Lepracaun Cartoon Monthly

    A look at the life and work of the political cartoonist Thomas Fitzpatrick, and how the cartoons in his magazine The Lepracaun Cartoon Monthly offer fresh insights into Irish life in the early twentieth century.  Myles talks to James Curry and Ciarán Wallace, authors of the book Thomas Fitzpatrick and the Lepracaun Cartoon Monthly 1905 - 1915. 

    Martin Ward

    An excerpt from the autobiography of the late Martin Ward. The book is called "When Iron Gates Yield to Freedom". It traces the life story of a father and grandfather, a singer and a local broadcaster, who spent much of his childhood in Artane Industrial School.

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    Guinness and the War

    Liam Geraghty reports on some of the World War One stories that can be found in the Guinness Archive. 

    Then, Deirdre McParland, manager of the archive talks about the exhibition Guinness and the War 1914 - 1918, which runs until the end of March.  The exhibition at The Little Museum of Dublin explores the role the Guinness company played in World War One, and records the stories of the employees who served, from Corporal to Private.

    Listen

    Timothy O'Neill Lane

    Tadhg Mulcahy talks about Timothy O'Neill Lane, the author of "Lane's English-Irish Dictionary", purported to be the first ever English-Irish dictionary published.

    Coiste Timothy O’Neill Lane: Commemorating  the centenary og the Templeglantine man's death in May 2015

    In May 2015, Timothy O’Neill Lane, born in Gurteen, Templeglantine, Co. Limerick will be dead 100 years. Honouring and commemorating this man’s death is of great significance to the history of the modern Irish language and culture. It is for this reason that a committee (Coiste Timothy O’Neill Lane) has been established to give recognition to his vast body of work with the ultimate goal of commemorating appropriately his contribution to the Gaelic tradition.

    A ceremony and commemoration to honour Timothy O’Neill Lane are planned for Saturday, 9 May 2015. The grave of O’Neill Lane today lies unmarked. The committee would like to erect a headstone with a surround of kerbing in keeping with the original headstone and flat grave marker of limestone on this double grave. These also need to be cleaned. Chips to cover 42sq.ft. will be placed around the flat grave marker. Coiste O’Neill Lane would also like to place a plaque in Templeglantine. The ceremony and commemoration will take place in conjunction with the blessing of the grave in Brosna and the unveiling of the plaque in Templeglantine respectively on Saturday the 9th of May. 

    Timothy O’Neill Lane

    O’Neill Lane was an impressive scholar and linguist with a varied career predominantly working with language and words. He was a teacher at Templeglantine National School, a clerk with the Incorporated Law Society, London, a journalist with the Times of London, a correspondent for English papers in Paris, a writer of travel books especially in the context of Ireland and lexicographer or compiler of dictionaries especially the final and 2nd edition Lane’s Larger English – Irish Dictionary. He worked on the dictionaries from 1883 until 1915, the year he died and the year Lane’s Larger English – Irish Dictionary was published. The first edition was published in 1904.

    This man was born in Gurteen, Templeglantine 1852, and he was buried in Brosna, Co. Kerry in May 1915 in an ancestral Leane grave. His ancestors on the Lane side came from Knockcoolkeare, Mountcollins and as it seems, previously from Brosna. Mary O’Neill from Ahane Cross, Brosna was his mother.

    Listen

    The Lepracaun Cartoon Monthly

    A look at the life and work of the political cartoonist Thomas Fitzpatrick, and how the cartoons in his magazine The Lepracaun Cartoon Monthly offer fresh insights into Irish life in the early twentieth century.

    Myles talks to James Curry and Ciarán Wallace, authors of the book Thomas Fitzpatrick and the Lepracaun Cartoon Monthly 1905 - 1915.

    Volume 1, Number 1, May 1905

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    Martin Ward's autobiography 'When Iron Gates Yield to Freedom'

    An excerpt from the autobiography of the late Martin Ward.  The book is called When Iron Gates Yield to Freedom

    It traces the life story of a father and grandfather, a singer and a local broadcaster, whose childhood was marred by the loss of his mother, and the time he spent in Artane Industrial School.

    March Book Club

    Our book club choice for March is Magna Carta: The Making and Legacy of the Great Charter by Dan Jones.   

    Our discussion will mark the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta.  We'll ask: Why is this historic document is so important? 

    Finn Mac Cuamaill Lecture at NUI Galway

    Tales of Finn mac Cumaill linked to places of exceptional natural resources: Public talk on Thursday 5th of March at NUI Galway

    Places associated with Finn mac Cumaill in the Fenian cycle of tales and named after him and his warrior band have an historical reality as important boundary points, hunting grounds and areas of mineral enrichment in medieval and prehistoric times.

    This concept will be explored further in a public lecture on 5 March by NUI Galway archaeologist, Professor Elizabeth FitzPatrick

    Finn mac Cumaill (Finn McCool) and his fían or warrior band are central figures in the literature and oral tradition of Gaelic-speaking peoples of Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Landforms and place-names associated with him and his hunting and martial activities include hills such as Seefin (Finn’s seat), Knockfinn (Finn’s Hill) and Formoyle (very bare place), caves such as Fingal’s Cave on the Isle of Arran, and causeways like the World Heritage Giant’s Causeway on the Co. Antrim coastline.

    Tales of Finn reveal that he lives in a strange boundary place, a wilderness at the margins of territories. An examination of places associated with him in the real landscape show that they occur where different rock types meet and where mineral and metal ores are usually found. Red deer frequented such places to obtain their essential mineral licks and so they became important hunting grounds in the past. “These place names are much more important than instances of the survival of Finn folklore. They indicate areas of enriched natural resources and physical boundaries in the landscape,” explains Professor Elizabeth FitzPatrick.

    The lecture is based on a project in Archaeology at NUI Galway, with NUI Galway’s Dr Ronan Hennessy and Dr Paul Naessens, Professor Joseph Nagy at UCLA, Dr Ruth Carden wildlife ecologist and Dr Matthew Parkes of the National Museum of Ireland. The aim is to produce a digital and print Atlas of Finn mac Cumaill’s Places which will showcase new knowledge about the relationships between archaeology, geology, wildlife ecology, mythology and place-names in landscape and settlement research.

    Professor FitzPatrick added, “Finn places on the edge of Western Europe may be the most enduring survival of a wider landscape expression of the Celtic place-name ‘vind’ and its associated phenomenon of boundaries and enriched natural resources, extending from Gorumna Island in south Connemara to Galatia in Asia Minor."

    The public talk will take place on Thursday, 5 March, at 6pm in the Moore Institute Seminar Room, Hardiman Research Building, NUI Galway.

    Gallipoli 100

    The History Show and the organisers of the annual Hay Literary Festival in Kells have joined forces, to launch a commemorative event "Gallipoli 100", marking the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the ill-fated WW1 Dardanelles campaign.  All events will take place in the Church of Ireland, Cannon St, Kells.  It will run from the 24th to the 26th of April 2015, the centenary of the first landings by troops on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey.

    The three-day programme of events will commence on the evening of Friday, 24th April with the Francis Ledwidge Memorial Lecture, delivered by the distinguished Irish WW1 historian Philip Orr.

    Click on the links below to view or download more information, and a draft schedule of events.

    Gallipoli 100 Information

    Gallipoli 100 Draft Schedule

    About The Show

    Bringing the past to life! Discover how our world was shaped as Myles Dungan and guests explore events ranging from medieval times to the recent past.

    We want to help explain ourselves to ourselves. We will search out fresh angles on familiar topics, seek out the unfamiliar and will not shy away from bizarre or controversial issues. Our ultimate goal is to make The History Show the primary port of call for those with an intense or even a modest interest in the subject. We want to entice the casual and the curious to join us in celebrating the past.

    Our aim is to create informative, reflective, stimulating and above all, entertaining radio.

    Join us on Sundays from 6.05pm for The History Show with Myles Dungan on RTÉ Radio 1.

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