Hundreds of mourners gathered in London last night for an emotional candlelit vigil in memory of the "amazing, caring, beautiful" primary school teacher Sabina Nessa, as the police hunt for her killer entered its second week.

Family members wiped away tears as they spoke movingly of the sorrow the 28-year-old's murder had caused, with detectives renewing appeals for information about a man captured on CCTV around the time and place of her death last Friday.

The Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton shared a personal message on Twitter, describing how she was "saddened by the loss of another innocent young woman on our streets".

Detective Chief Inspector Trevor Lawry told the more than 500 people gathered at the vigil in Pegler Square, Kidbrooke, south-east London: "Please help us catch the person responsible for this shocking incident."

Ms Nessa had been walking to meet a friend at a pub near her home when she was fatally attacked in Cator Park.

Her body was discovered by a member of the public the next day, having been hidden under a pile of leaves, it was reported.

Two men were separately arrested on suspicion of her murder but were subsequently released under investigation.

The Metropolitan Police remain keen to trace a third man spotted near where Ms Nessa was killed on the night she died.

They released a 12-second clip showing a balding man wearing a black hooded coat and grey jeans, holding an orange object, looking over his shoulder and pulling at his hood.

Detectives also circulated an image, captured in the same area, of a silver car they believe the man had access to and appealed for anyone who recognised either to contact the force immediately.

Those attending the vigil - where mourners were asked to "say her name" in a show of solidarity - and a separate rally earlier in the evening at East London Mosque heard powerful testimony from Ms Nessa's family.

Jebina Yasmin Islam, Ms Nessa's sister, broke down as she addressed crowds at the vigil.

She said: "I just want to say thank you to everyone who came today to show support for my sister.

"We have lost an amazing, caring, beautiful sister, who left this world far too early."

She added: "Sabina loved her family.

"Words cannot describe how we are feeling, this feels like we are stuck in a bad dream and can't get out of it - our world is shattered, we are simply lost for words.

"No family should go through what we are going through."

Ms Nessa's uncle Shahin Miah described his niece as "a kind and a open-minded person", who was "always smiling and helping others".

He said Ms Nessa's death has "once again brought to the fore the question of women's safety on the streets".

In his statement, he said: "We don't want what happened to Sabina to happen to anyone else.

"We don't want any other mother's chest to be empty or filled with deep sorrow, or to see the tears in the eyes of any father."

On Twitter, the Duchess of Cambridge wrote: "I am saddened by the loss of another innocent young woman on our streets.

"My thoughts are with Sabina's family and friends, and all those who have been affected by this tragic event. C"

It is understood flowers have been laid on the duchess's behalf.

In March, the duchess privately visited the memorial to murdered marketing executive Sarah Everard in Clapham Common, south-west London, after the 33-year-old was killed by off-duty police officer Wayne Couzens.

He is due to be sentenced next week.

Anyone with information about Ms Nessa's death is asked to contact police.

The Victims' Commissioner for England & Wales has said the police need to do more to make the streets safe for women and girls.

Vera Baird, who said she attended the vigil, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "Apparently the police have been giving out rape alarms to women and giving leaflets out saying how to stay safe in a public place.

"It is less, isn't it, about giving women leaflets on keeping themselves safe in dangerous places and more about the police making the streets safe for women?"

Put to her that there needed to be societal change along with police intervention, she replied: "It certainly isn't just a job for the police but, look, the police do have a very key role here.

"Three-quarters of women over 16 have been harassed in a public place and don't feel safe.

"They need to know that the police understand that and will use all the powers they have got to keep the streets safe."