Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal, who was exposed to a nerve agent along with his daughter, has been discharged from Salisbury District Hospital.

Mr Skripal, 66, and his daughter Yulia Skripal, 33, were admitted to Salisbury District Hospital along with Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey after being exposed to the novichok agent on 4 March.

All three have now been discharged following the incident.

Britain has accused Russia of being behind the nerve agent attack and Western governments, including the United States, have expelled more than 100 Russian diplomats.

Russia has denied any involvement in the poisoning and has retaliated in kind.

However, Russian President Vladimir Putin has wished Mr Skripal "good health" following his discharge from hospital.

"God grant him good health... If a military-grade poison had been used, the man would have died on the spot. Thank God he recovered and that he left (hospital)," Mr Putin said during a press conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

"We have several times offered our British partners any necessary assistance in the investigation (of the poisoning). So far we have received no response. Our offer remains open."

The Skripals were in a critical condition for weeks and doctors at one point feared that, even if they survived, they might have suffered brain damage.

However, their health began to improve rapidly, and Ms Skripal was discharged last month.

In a statement, the hospital said: "While these patients have now been discharged, their right to patient confidentiality remains and limits us from giving detailed accounts of the treatment these individuals received.

"However, treating people who are so acutely unwell, having been poisoned by nerve agents, requires stabilising them, keeping them alive until their bodies could produce more enzymes to replace those that had been poisoned."

Salisbury District Hospital chief executive Cara Charles-Barks said: "It is fantastic news that Sergei Skripal is well enough to leave Salisbury District Hospital.

"That he, Yulia and DS Bailey have been able to leave us so soon after coming into contact with this nerve agent is thanks to the hard work, skill and professionalism of our clinicians, who provide outstanding care to all our patients, day in and day out.

"This has been a difficult time for those caught up in this incident - the patients, our staff and the people of Salisbury.

"I want to thank the public for their support, and I want to pay a special tribute to both the clinical staff here at the trust and those who work so hard behind the scenes."

The Russian ambassador to the UK welcomed the development and repeated his demand for consular access to Sergei and Yulia Skripal.

At a news conference at his official residence in London, Alexander Yakovenko said: "We want them to tell (us) personally what they want. If they don't want our assistance, that's fine, but we want to see them physically."

Mr Yakovenko has claimed the UK is violating international law by not granting access to the Skripals.

Scotland Yard has said it will not discuss "any protective or security arrangements" for Mr Skripal and his daughter following their discharge from hospital.