A minicab driver sparked a major terror alert when his car ploughed into pedestrians in the heart of one of London's busiest tourist areas, leaving 11 people injured.

People fled after the black Toyota Prius mounted the footpath close to the Natural History Museum (NHM) in South Kensington this afternoon.

Video footage posted on Twitter showed a man being restrained on the ground by members of the public after the incident.

But Scotland Yard later confirmed the incident, which occurred shortly after 2.20pm, was "not being treated as a terror-related incident" and a man had been arrested over a traffic collision.

Those hurt were mostly suffering from head or leg injuries, the London Ambulance Service said, with nine taken to hospital. None were in a life-threatening condition.

A Metropolitan Police spokesman said: "Whilst inquiries continue it is believed a car mounted the pavement and collided with a number of pedestrians.

"The man detained by officers is currently under arrest and is in custody at a north London police station.

"The incident is a road traffic investigation and not a terrorist-related incident."

Pictures and footage from the scene showed street damage and a massive police presence in the capital's museum district, home to the NHM, the Science Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Some images showed the black Toyota Prius, registered with Transport for London as a minicab, that had collided with a silver Vauxhall saloon and a Jaguar.

Britain is on its second highest security alert level, meaning an attack by militants is considered highly likely. There have been five attacks described by the authorities as terrorism this year, three involving vehicles.

In March, a man drove a car into pedestrians on London's Westminster Bridge killing four before stabbing a police officer to death in the grounds of parliament.

Three Islamist militants drove into people on London Bridge in June before stabbing people at nearby restaurants and bars, killing eight. The same month, a van was driven into worshippers near a mosque in north London which left one man dead.

The Natural History Museum is the fourth most popular tourist attraction in the United Kingdom, with 4.6 million visits during 2016, according to the Association of Leading Visitor Attractions.