Boris Johnson has repeatedly refused to answer questions about British police being called to his London flat last night.

Speaking during a leadership hustings in Birmingham in the race to win the Tory crown and be the next Prime Minister, Mr Johnson said: "I don't think they want to hear about that kind of thing."

The hustings event came a day after it emerged that officers were called to the London home Mr Johnson shares with partner Carrie Symonds after neighbours said there had been a loud altercation involving screaming, shouting and banging.

When asked by hustings moderator Iain Dale whether a person's private life has any bearing on someone's ability to discharge the office of prime minister, the crowd booed and Mr Johnson said: "Don't boo the great man."

Mr Johnson added: "I've tried to give my answer pretty exhaustively.

"I think what people want to know is whether I have the determination and the courage to deliver on the commitments that I'm making and it will need a lot of grit right now."

Mr Johnson said: "People are entitled to ask about me and my determination, my character and what I want to do for the country.

"Let me just tell you that when I make a promise in politics, about what I'm going to do, I keep that promise and I deliver."

Mr Dale told Mr Johnson he was "completely avoiding" the question. 

He also promised to "get Brexit done", telling the audience at the event in Birmingham that he was the man to "unleash on the project." Mr Johnson told Tory members: "The hour is darkest before dawn.

"And I am here to tell you that in all confidence we can turn this thing around." 


Meanwhile, Jeremy Hunt said if the wrong person is sent to Brussels, "catastrophe awaits".

Addressing the audience in Birmingham, he added: "If you choose me I'll be the first prime minister who's been an entrepreneur by background."

Mr Hunt said entrepreneurs negotiate, adding: "If we send the wrong person there's going to be no negotiation, no trust, no deal, and if parliament stops that, maybe no Brexit.

"Send the right person and there's a deal to be done. Send that right person and we can do what we all need to do, which is come back with something positive for our country.

"And that's what I want to do."

Caller was concerned for welfare of female neighbour, says Scotland Yard

Scotland Yard said they were alerted to Mr Johnson's domestic situation last night by a caller who "was concerned for the welfare of a female neighbour".

A neighbour, a 32-year-old nursery worker who would only give her name as Fatimah, said: "Just after midnight I heard a lady shouting, but I couldn't make out what she said, then I heard plates and glasses smashing and things being thrown around.

"I was watching something on the television and I had to mute it because I was quite concerned, it was coming through the walls.

"It lasted for just under ten minutes, and a police car turned up first, and then a police van a few minutes later."

She said she was unsure who called police, who were at the scene for about ten minutes before leaving.

The Metropolitan Police said it responded to a call from a local resident at 12.24am on Friday.

A police spokesman said: "The caller was concerned for the welfare of a female neighbour.

"Police attended and spoke to all occupants of the address, who were all safe and well.

"There were no offences or concerns apparent to the officers and there was no cause for police action."

The revelations about Mr Johnson followed a day of turmoil for the Tories which saw a difficult by-election looming after Chris Davies was ousted as the Tory MP for Brecon and Radnorshire after constituents signed a petition to remove him following a conviction for faking expenses claims.

And Chief Whip Julian Smith promised an investigation after MP Antoinette Sandbach was called a "disgrace" by an unnamed male colleague.

Meanwhile, Mark Field, an ally of Mr Hunt, was suspended as a Foreign Office minister after manhandling a climate change protester at a black-tie dinner.