Here are people Barack Obama has chosen for key posts in his administration after he takes office on 20 January. Most remain subject to US Senate confirmation.

Mr Obama still has to name a choice for commerce secretary after New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson withdrew.

Full coverage at RTÉ.ie/Inauguration

Secretary of State

New York Senator Hillary Clinton, Mr Obama's former Democratic Party rival for the White House, was named to the top diplomatic post. The move is seen as part of Mr Obama's effort to rebuild the country’s reputation abroad. Aides have said Mr Obama admires Ms Clinton's work ethic and also believes the former first lady's star power would boost his vision of improving the country’s global standing.

Secretary of Defense

Current Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, named by President George W Bush in late 2006, is considered a moderate voice on the Republican's national security team and embodies an important signal of continuity. Mr Obama had said early on he would include Republicans in his Cabinet and the 65-year-old Mr Gates has been lauded by members of both parties since taking over the Pentagon from Donald Rumsfeld.

Treasury Secretary

Timothy Geithner, president of the New York Federal Reserve Bank, is Mr Obama's choice for the Treasury Department, making him Mr Obama's point person in dealing with the economic crisis. Mr Geithner has helped lead efforts to stabilize financial markets and argued that banks crucial to the global financial system should operate under a unified regulatory framework.

Homeland Security

Janet Napolitano, the Democratic Governor of Arizona, was named to head the US Homeland Security Department, a sprawling agency formed to bolster civil defence following the 11 September attacks.

National Economic Council

Lawrence Summers, 53, has been chosen to head the council. He was treasury secretary for the final 1-1/2 years of the Clinton Administration and has been a senior adviser to Mr Obama for several months, helping to guide his response to the financial meltdown.

National Security Advisor

Retired Marine General James Jones, the former top operational commander of NATO, was named by Mr Obama to be his national security adviser. Mr Jones is widely respected by both Democrats and Republicans and has avoided aligning himself with either party but is known to have been a strong critic of the Bush administration's handling of the Iraq war.

CIA Director

Former Clinton White House chief of staff Leon Panetta has received the nod to head the CIA. Mr Panetta, best known for imposing order on President Bill Clinton's White House during his 1994-1997 stint as chief of staff, has relatively little experience in national security matters. But his choice could appease some liberal activists who have said that Mr Obama's other picks for key national-security posts are too hawkish.

Attorney General

Eric Holder, a former Justice Department official in the Clinton Administration, will run the Justice Department. Mr Holder has been a senior legal adviser to Mr Obama's campaign and helped vet his vice presidential candidates.

Secretary of Energy

Steven Chu, director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory who shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in physics, is Mr Obama's choice for secretary of energy. Mr Chu was an early advocate for finding scientific solutions to climate change and guided the Lawrence Berkeley laboratory to become the world leader in alternative and renewable energy research.

Secretary of Interior

Senator Ken Salazar of Colorado, who once practiced as an environmental lawyer, was named to head the Interior Department. The son of Americans of Mexican descent, he will be a key member of Mr Obama's energy team who would oversee the leasing of federal lands for oil and gas drilling.

Energy, Environment Coordinator

Carol Browner, the former head of the Environmental Protection Agency during the Clinton Administration, was named to a new position coordinating White House policy on energy, climate and environmental issues. The new position was expected to spearhead climate change policy.

Secretary of Health and Human Services

Tom Daschle, a key early supporter and savvy former US Senate leader, was selected by Mr Obama as Secretary of Health and Human Services. The high-profile selection signals that the push to extend health coverage to the 46 million uninsured Americans will be a high priority for Mr Obama.

Secretary of Education

Arne Duncan, head of the Chicago public school system, is Mr Obama's pick for Secretary of Education. Mr Duncan, a fellow Harvard graduate and long-time friend of Mr Obama's, has earned a strong reputation at the helm of the country's third-largest public school district, tackling problems including teacher quality and failing schools.

Secretary of Agriculture

Tom Vilsack, a former governor from the major US farm state Iowa, is Mr Obama's choice to be agriculture secretary. Mr Vilsack backs tighter farm subsidy rules and new-generation biofuels. One of his major issues as governor was bringing more high-tech agribusiness to Iowa.

Secretary of Transportation
Representative Ray LaHood, a Republican, has been offered the job of transportation secretary. Mr LaHood hails from Mr Obama's home state of Illinois and is said to have a rapport with the president-elect.

Securities and Exchange Commission

Mary Schapiro, a veteran financial market regulator, is Mr Obama's pick to head the Securities and Exchange Commission. Ms Schapiro currently leads the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the largest nongovernmental regulator for all securities firms doing business with the US public. She is a former SEC commissioner and former chairwoman of the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

Secretary of Labor

California Democratic Representative Hilda Solis, 51, has been chosen to lead the Department of Labor. Ms Solis, who represents a Southern California district made up largely of Hispanic and Asian voters, is among the most liberal members of the US House of Representatives and has taken a lead on both environmental and labour issues.

US Trade Representative
Former Dallas Mayor Ron Kirk has been selected to be US trade representative. Mr Kirk, a partner at the Houston-based law firm of Vinson and Elkins, is little known in Washington trade circles and became Mr Obama's pick after his first choice, Representative Xavier Becerra, a California Democrat and member of the House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee, turned down the job.

Director of National Intelligence
Retired Navy Admiral Dennis Blair is Mr Obama's choice to be the top US intelligence official. As director of national intelligence, Mr Blair would oversee the entire US intelligence apparatus and be responsible for delivering Mr Obama's daily intelligence briefing. His nomination would keep an experienced military leader in the post. Mr Blair is a four-star admiral and former top US military commander in the Pacific region.