It was always going to be a difficult day. Meeting someone who has lost their life partner in a farming accident is tough.

It brings back a lot of memories, it's always emotional. But the day got off to a start I hadn’t expected. We arranged to meet Angela Hogan at sheds her partner Brendan had built in preparation for their life together.

The sheds would create a yard, on one side Brendan’s machinery, on the other, the house where he and Angela would bring up their children, Ronan and Grace.

But the house was never built. A fatal farming accident brought all that to an end.

We arrived into the yard near Cloughjordan.

Angela was there, with Grace, and for moral support she brought her mother.

In an old hay shed they had set up the kitchen, and the kettle was on, the biscuits out. On an out farm, which is now let, they had set up home for the morning.

You could immediately sense this meant something to Angela, to make tea there, a place where she no longer spends time.

It was an immediate statement of how a farm fatality can change lives forever.

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Angela recalled how, in the days after the funeral, most people commented that Brendan was so safety conscious, everyone thought he was the last one who would be killed farming.

But, he was. A baler fell on him as he carried out a check. A routine job, something he had done thousands of times. But that’s the reality with farming accidents. They happen so quickly, so easily.

A simple trip getting out of a tractor can be enough.

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Contrast that with the videos posted on TikTok in recent weeks, of people engaging in dangerous and silly behaviour with farm machinery.

It was widely criticised, and as RTÉ News reports aired showing the material, you could see the posts disappear from the app one by one.

Accounts were locked. Clearly, there was shame about what had happened, that having the behaviour exposed and roundly criticised had an impact.

But why would someone video themselves or others acting recklessly or dangerously? Especially in a sector which sees more fatal accidents than any other workplace.

There is an answer. Cyber psychologist Nicola Fox Hamilton said we do things online that we would never do in so-called 'real life'. She said online risk-taking behaviour is something "men are much more likely to engage in than women".

She also said there is an impulsivity involved that means people do not consider the consequences of their actions, they have "no regard for the outcome of that behaviour".

The internet feels anonymous - people who know the dangers behave differently there. It’s like it’s not real.

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For gardaí, it is a big issue too.

We met Kilrush-based Sergeant Edel Burke this week. She has visited dozens of farm accident sites, the scenes of multiple fatalities. Meeting her, you can tell she cares. She talked about going to a farm and seeing a body in the field or the yard, friends and family gathered round, grief stricken.

She said that as a police officer, she has a job to collect evidence for the coroner, bring the family to formally identify the body before the post-mortem examination. But, she said, the months afterwards are where the support function kicks in.

Thirteen people have been killed on farms so far this year. Shockingly, three of them were children.

When we asked Sgt Burke about the TikTok videos, she was bordering on angry. She said when you compare the devastation of families where there is a fatality, to young men posting dangerous videos, it is "horrific". Standing beside her patrol car, she said "they have no regard for themselves or their families".

She recalled a scene where an elderly man had been attacked by a young bullock and killed, the family standing around devastated. She spoke of guilt and blame. Then, she returned to the TikTok behaviour, saying: "They obviously haven’t come across anything like this or they wouldn’t dare do anything that could put themselves or their families through months of grief and guilt."

Thirteen people have been killed on farms so far this year. Shockingly, three of them were children.

In April, the Health and Safety Authority raised a flag of concern. In a field in Meath, we met with Pat Griffin from the authority. He was blunt, the headline stark. There could be more child deaths on farms because of the lockdown.

On social media, there were accusations that it was scaremongering. In fact, the HSA was speaking from bitter experience, and it knew there would be issues ahead. Children were off school and on farms all day, posing a definite risk.

The lockdown meant increased risks for adults, too. During the last recession, people were out of work and they were helping out more on farms. Their awareness of the dangers is not as heightened as farmers accustomed to being on farms full-time. There is an obvious risk.

Almost every week for the past few months, my phone rings at least once to alert me to another farm fatality.

This week had been going well, and there wasn’t a call until Friday. News came in late in the afternoon about a man who had been killed working on a combine harvester in Kilkenny.

It’s a dread, when that call comes. You know a family is devastated, you picture the scene. Yet, you report it. Campaigners want it to be reported - it creates awareness.

For the next ten days, Embrace Farm, a charity which supports farm accident victims and their families, holds its farm safety campaign. On social media, people are being asked to post their memories and stories using the hashtag #WeRememberYou. It will conclude with a memorial service on 28 June, when the names of those who have died will be read out. It is an annual service, the only one marking farm deaths.

It will be aired on RTÉ on 5 July.