Alphabet's Google has unveiled the second generation of its Pixel smartphone along with new voice-enabled home speakers.

The company said it was redoubling its commitment to the hardware business as it competes with a surge of devices from Apple and Amazon.com. 

Google's new products, including a Pixelbook laptop, wireless earbuds and a small GoPro-like camera, showcase Google-developed operating systems and services, notably the voice assistant. 

That means usage of those devices should stoke the company's core ad sales business as buyers of the hardware use Google services like search and maps.

Speaking at the launch in San Francisco, Google hardware chief Rick Osterloh said the new products "perfectly demonstrate our strategy of re-imagining hardware from the inside out."

The Pixel 2 smartphone comes in two sizes, with comparable features, including aluminum bodies and no traditional jacks for headphones. 

The Pixel phones lack the brand lustre and market share of similarly priced smartphones such as the Apple iPhone or Samsung Electronics Co's Galaxy S and Galaxy Note smartphones. 

But the original Pixel's camera and software drew acclaim from reviewers, many of whom expect the line to become a robust competitor at the high end of the Android smartphone market. 

Pixelbook is the first laptop powered by Google Assistant and will support Snap Snapchat, the company said. 

The keyboard folds behind the screen to turn the 12.3-inch touchscreen into a tablet. 

The Pixel smartphone debuted a year ago, with analysts estimating sales of more than 2 million, pushing Google to record amounts of non-advertising revenue. 
 

Google's "other" revenue category, which includes both hardware and sales of online storage services, accounted for about 12% of overall sales in its most recent quarter. 

Last month, Google expanded its hardware development capabilities by picking up a 2,000-person smartphone engineering team at HTC for $1.1 billion.

Google moved into smartphones five years ago with the $12.5-billion purchase of Motorola Mobility. 

But Motorola's hardware team, under Osterloh, and Google's Android mobile operating system division remained independent. 

Google wanted to avoid giving it a special advantage and protect its relationships with Samsung, LG and other distributors of Android. The company later sold the Motorola smartphone business.

Osterloh, now working inside Google, moved to bring in-house the HTC team Google contracted to design the Pixel. 

Protecting relationships with others in the Android ecosystem has now become less of a concern. 

Samsung ratched down the rivalary with Google after the firms agreed to a major patent licensing deal in early 2014. Other vendors have seen their market share dip.

Google's eye is now on Apple, whose iPhone has become the smartphone to beat.