Former UKIP leader Nigel Farage has said he is warming to the idea of holding a second referendum on Britain's membership of the European Union, arguing that another vote would see "Leave" win again and end the debate.

"Maybe, just maybe, I'm reaching the point of thinking that we should have a second referendum ... on EU membership," Mr Farage told Channel Five's The Wright Stuff programme.

"I think if we had a second referendum on EU membership we'd kill it off for a generation. The percentage that would vote to leave next time would be very much bigger than it was last time round."

However, his party's leader, Henry Bolton said UKIP opposes a second referendum. 

He said he was convinced that the leave campaign would win a second vote by a larger margin than the 52%-48% in 2016, but to a hold a second referendum would "set a precedent for revisiting any democratic decision made in future".

Britons remain divided over the leaving the EU, with some, including former Labour prime minister Tony Blair, saying the decision should be overturned.

A number of MPs are arguing for a second public vote on the terms of the exit deal. 

Mr Farage said: "What is for certain is that the Cleggs, the Blairs, the Adonises will never ever, ever give up. They will go on whinging and whining and moaning all the way through this process.

"The percentage that would vote to leave next time would be very much bigger than it was last time round. And we may just finish the whole thing off. And Blair can disappear off into total obscurity."

Meanwhile, Brexit could cost the UK nearly 500,000 jobs in a worst-case scenario, according to a study commissioned by the Mayor of London.

Britain could lose 482,000 jobs by 2030 if the country crashes out of the European Union, according to research by Cambridge Econometrics.

A scenario in which the UK fails to agree a transition deal and future trading relationship with the EU would also cost Britain £46.7 billion (€52.7bn) in investment over the same period.

The report compares four possible post-Brexit scenarios to the option of maintaining the status quo - already ruled out by the British government - of staying in the European single market and customs union.

The most optimistic Brexit scenario outlined, of a two-year transition period leading to single market membership without the customs union, would still lead to a loss of 176,000 jobs and £20.2 billion in investment.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan, who campaigned against Brexit, commissioned the study and said the findings show "the potential economic risks - and human costs - at stake in the negotiations" in Brussels.

In a statement, Mr Khan accused the British government of a "complete lack of preparation" in assessing the impact of Brexit, urging ministers to change their negotiating position and agree to remain in the single market and customs union.

Prime Minister Theresa May said she is working to secure the best trade deal with the European Union after Mr Khan warned that Britain could lose almost 500,000 jobs if it fails to agree a deal.

"The figure you referred to was his 'no deal' scenario. What we are doing is working for the best deal for the British people for Brexit," Mrs May told reporters.

"We can achieve arrangements and agreements with the European Union, and I am confident that we will be able to achieve a good deal."

Cambridge Econometrics also forecast that the worst-case scenario would lead to the largest drop in immigration, allowing the government to reach its target of under 100,000 arrivals from 2020 onwards but hitting productivity.

Comparatively, maintaining the status quo would see migration falling from 232,000 in 2020 to 220,000 a decade later.

Transition arrangements, trade and security will be on the agenda of Brexit negotiations later this year before Britain leaves the EU in March 2019.