More than half of smartphone users in Ireland think they use their devices too much, according to a new survey, which also found that on average smartphone users here look at their phones 55 times a day.

A representative sample of 1,000 adults were questioned online by Ipsos MORI for Deloitte's annual Mobile Consumer Survey and the results show our love affair with mobile devices continues.

97% of consumers in Ireland have access to either a smartphone or tablet and 98% of smartphone owners use their devices daily.

In fact the results show on average they look at them 55 times a day, down from 57 last year.

However, 13% admitted to checking their devices 100 times in every 24 hour period.

A fifth of Irish adults check their phones within five minutes of waking, down from over a quarter last year.

And when it comes to functions, three out of every four of those surveyed said they use mobile banking on their devices, up slightly on 2017.

Two fifths said they have a music subscription, with 35% paying for an online news service.

Concerns about cyberbullying were raised in the Dáil by the leader of the Labour Party in the wake of the report's publication.

Speaking during Leaders' Questions, Brendan Howlin warned that "the internet has a dark side."

He cited the example of people using websites to fool younger people into sending intimate photos of themselves.

Mr Howlin said there is a growing evidence of cyberbullying being linked to harassment of young people. 1427

The Wexford TD called for regulation of the area of online harassment and bullying as people are losing their lives through suicide and harassment.

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar acknowledged that cyberbullying is a serious issue.

He said the Connecting for Life national suicide strategy is in place and it is making a real difference.

The Taoiseach said there has been a 30% reduction in the number of suicides in the last few years.

Mr Varadkar also said the Government has no principled objection to the Labour party's proposal to establish a Digital Safety Commissioner.

Additional reporting: Conor McMorrow