An EgyptAir jet that crashed last week showed no technical issues before taking off from Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris according to an Aircraft Technical Log signed by its pilot before takeoff, Egyptian state-owned newspaper Al-Ahram said tonight.             

Al-Ahram published a scan of the log on its website.             

Egypt's largest state newspaper also reported that EgyptAir flight 804 transmitted 11 "electronic messages" starting at 10.09pm Irish time on 18 May.

The first two indicated that the engines were functional.             

The third message came at 1.26am Irish time on 19 May and showed a rise in the temperature of the co-pilot's window.

The plane kept transmitting messages for the next three minutes before vanishing off radar screens, the Al-Ahram report said.             

EgyptAir flight 804 vanished from radar screens last Thursday, with 66 passengers and crew on board.

The head of Egypt's forensics authority earlier dismissed a suggestion that the small size of the body parts retrieved since the plane crashed last week indicated there was an explosion on board.

Investigators struggling to work out why the Airbus A320 jet vanished from radar screens are looking for clues in the human remains and debris recovered from the Mediterranean Sea so far.

The plane and its black box recorders, which could explain what brought down the Paris-Cairo flight as it entered Egyptian air space, have not been located.

An Egyptian forensic official earlier said the human remains recovered so far suggested there had been an explosion, although no trace of explosives had been detected.

But Hisham Abdelhamid, head of Egypt's forensics authority, said that assessment was "mere assumptions" and that it was too early to draw conclusions.

At least two other sources with direct knowledge of the investigation also said it would be premature to say what caused the plane to plunge into the sea.

French investigators say the plane sent a series of warnings indicating that smoke had been detected on board as well as other possible computer faults shortly before it disappeared.      

The signals did not indicate what may have caused the smoke, and aviation experts have said that neither deliberate sabotage nor a technical fault could be ruled out.             

Investigators rely on debris, bags and clothes as well as chemical analysis to detect the imprints of an explosion, according to people involved in two previous probes where deliberate blasts were involved.             

An Egyptian team formed by the Civil Aviation Ministry is conducting the technical investigation and three officials from France's BEA air accident investigation agency have also been in Cairo since Friday, with an expert from Airbus, to assist.