Dublin's Stella Cinema has been named as the best cinema in Britain and Ireland by a series of Time Out writers.

Writers Phil de Semlyen, Alim Kheraj, Chiara Wilkinson, Katie McCabe, Rosie Hewitson, Joe Mackertich, Isabelle Aron, Chris Waywell and Huw Oliver travelled across England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland on behalf of travel and entertainment guide, Time Out, to find the very best spots for movie lovers, and share what makes them special.

Luckily for Irish cinephiles, the number one spot is conveniently located in Dublin.

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Sat in heart of Dublin 6, the Stella theatre was originally designed by architectural firm Higginbotham & Stafford and was opened in 1923.

It once held 1,283 patrons, making it Ireland's largest cinema at the time, and even featured an art-deco style ballroom on the first floor and a fountain in the foyer.

The Rathmines venue closed its doors in 2004 but was restored to its original glory when it was reopened in 2017. During the renovation, the owners uncovered some of the building's historical features including a note from three of its 1920s builders found plastered into the ceiling.

In addition, they unearthed the original facade with granite pilasters, decorative ceiling moldings, detailed mosaic tiling with the original Stella logo, and "a typical art deco" handrail leading to the first floor.

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According to Time Out writer Katie McCabe, the Stella stole the top stops thanks to it's art-deco style, ballroom cocktail bar and mouth-watering snack menu:

"Now a cocktail bar serving pisco sours can be found in the old ballroom, and things are pretty upmarket when it comes to the snacks too – we’re talking buttermilk chicken and cinnamon churros – all to be consumed from side tables with their own vintage, low-lit lamps."

"It’s about indulgence not savings – tickets sold by armchair (19 euros), bed, or couch (both 38 euros for two), with cashmere blankets for maximum cosiness. Stella has come a long, long way from the days when locals use to know it as 'the flea house’."

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The Dublin hot spot was joined by five other movie theatres from around the country: Queen's Film Theatre, Belfast; The Light House Cinema, Dublin; The Irish Film Institute, Dublin; Strand Arts Centre, Belfast; The Phoenix Cinema, Dingle.

In at number 11 was Queen's Film Theatre in Belfast which writer Phil de Semlyen praised for its staying power:

"This campus-based venue started life in 1968 with a pair of second hand projectors, a screen and a DIY ethos that have helped turn an old uni lecture theatre into a world-renowned cinema. Fifty-odd years later and it's still a haven for movie lovers in University Square Mews of Queen’s University, who come for smart foreign language, documentary and art house fare."

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Clearly a fan of Irish venues, Phil de Semlyen placed The Light House Cinema in Dublin at number 15 thanks to its impressive movie connections.

"This Dublin institution is owned and run by proper movie buffs Element Pictures – the production company behind The Favourite and Normal People – and you can absolutely tell. The programming is smart and bold, with film fests, including the Dublin International Film Festival, rubbing shoulders with new releases and repertory screenings."

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The Irish Film Institute in Dublin made the list at 23 under the advisement of writer Huw Oliver who described the Temple Bar complex as: "a film fan’s first port of call for domestic releases in the Irish capital."

"It also shows international independent productions that often aren’t screened anywhere else in Ireland, and hosts film festivals, retrospectives and curated seasons," he added.

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The Strand Arts Centre in Belfast came in at 32 thanks to Phil de Semlyen, who highlighted the venue's interesting origins and reasonable prices:

"Originally opened in 1935, when 1,170 punters packed in to watch Shirley Temple in Bright Eyes, its nautical design paid tribute to the Harland & Wolff shipyard down the road. Since 2013, it’s been a mixed art space, with theatre, gigs and community events sharing the stage with a four-screen cinema serving up to diverse fare to moviegoers paying £6 (at most)."

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Finally, The Phoenix Cinema in Dingle came in at number 48, with writer Phil de Semlyen describing the cinema as exceptionally warm and family-friendly:

"It's the kind of place where you’ll get a warm welcome on the way in and a thank you on the way out. Tuesday night’s 'Art Film’ club screenings come with free tea and biscuits. You can tell it’s run by a family, albeit a family of film nuts who charge €8.50 for an evening screening but would probably let everyone in for free if it was remotely viable."

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Click here for Time Out's full list of the 50 best cinemas in the UK and Ireland.