Comedian Kevin McGahern and his wife, Siobhan, welcomed their daughter into the world on December 22nd. The Cavan man revealed the news over Zoom yesterday afternoon while promoting his new comedy show, Clear History.

"We were lucky enough, there were no complications at all," he explained. "It was a textbook birth, everything went well and she is very healthy. Both mammy and baby are healthy and, luckily, we got home just in time for Christmas Eve. We're just delighted with that."

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Due to current COVID-19 restrictions, Kevin wasn't allowed to be in the room with Siobhan for the hours leading up to her labour. 

"I got in for the birth which I am very grateful for. I didn't get in for the prolonged 12 hours beforehand where I think I was very much needed. But I was there when it happened."

Describing it as the most "bizarre" thing he's seen in his life, McGahern says he cried and laughed while witnessing the birth of his daughter, Wallis.

"She's named after Siobhan's mother's maiden name which has kind of died out so we thought we'd keep it alive by feminising it slightly."

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It's been a busy few months for the funnyman. Not only did he welcome his daughter to the world but he spent much of the pandemic entertaining the nation with TV shows such as Kevin Paints..., Summer at Seven, and now Clear History.

The comedy panel series is kicking off on RTÉ2 tonight, fronted by McGahern and led by team captains Joanne McNally and Colin Murphy. However, according to Joanne, the 'panel' label is still up for debate.

"Is it a panel show? It's not a panel show in a traditional sense. To me, a panel show is like The Panel or Mock the Week - it's ten men and one woman," she jokes.  "This is more like story telling for perverse adults."

"It's a very Irish approach to a panel show," agrees Kevin, "the one good thing Irish people are good at is telling long and embarrassing stories."

"Joanne is an embarrassing story machine. It's like she was bred by the government in a lab just to make embarrassing stories."

The premise of the show is to give people a chance to confess their most embarrassing moments in the name of giving the rest of us a good laugh. 

With stories from weekly guests, the general public, and our two team leaders, there is sure to be a mountain of cringey moments on display. 

"I think telling embarrassing stories is quite liberating," explains Kevin, "because you can carry around these horrible incidents in your soul, it eats away, you wake up at 4 o'clock in the morning and you're like 'oh my god, I can't believe I did that'."

"But when you tell somebody else that story and you get a laugh, it kind of makes it worth it."

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Having previously described standup as "therapy where you actually get paid", McGahern insists that unloading your most cringe-inducing moments to the public is a "therapeutic way to get over embarrassment and shame".

Of course, it helps that McGahern himself won't be sharing any tales ("I just got to make fun of Joanne and Colin"), but thankfully Joanne doesn't seem to mind:

"The longer you're in comedy, the more you lose your sense of shame. You're so used to having no filter, it all slips out quite easily at this stage."

Tune into Clear History on RTÉ2 every Thursday at 9:30pm