What are your plans this weekend? Maybe a walk, a cute brunch with friends, perhaps a classic barbecue spread of burgers and sausages? Ideal.

For chef Nico Reynolds, though, his weekend is looking a little different. With the Dublin chef currently working in London, and staying near the Thames, he's planning on making the most of it. "I brought a grill over so I'm gonna go grill on the banks of the Thames, bring my tunes and do what I do", he laughs.

What he does is cook mouthwatering food, either in his restaurant Irish-Caribbean Lil Portie or in his back garden, barefoot and with a spread of luscious ingredients laid out before him, ready to be barbecued to some chill tunes.

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Reynolds is fast becoming known for his soulful and resolutely chill style of cooking, and any given weekend you'll catch him over on Instagram cooking up everything from smashed plantain sandwiches and Cuban style prawns, to grilled pineapple and crab and cheese sweet potato rosti.

Now, Reynolds is sharing his knowledge in his new show Grill Seeker, which drops on RTÉ Player today. In it he'll be sharing "tricks and techniques that you may not know but if you've been around heat and fire, it's an intrinsic skill that we wouldn't have got far as a species if we didn't know".

"This is about waking up those dormant skills that we forgot about", he adds.

Humans evolved by cooking over open flames outdoors, so there's a primal inclination towards grilling in us. But more than that, cooking over smouldering embers is woven into our history, Reynolds notes, stretching as far back as Fionn mac Cumhaill and the Salmon of Knowledge. "I struggle sometimes not to think why we don't have a grilling fish culture in Ireland", he says.

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"You could ask the question, what part of our history did we lose it? Somewhere along the way, we just said nah, it's not for us."

"There's a reason it's transcended time, it's transcended culture, and it's transcended every part of this globe from literally beginning to where we are now. It's the art of the gathering. It's the hearth. It brings you home. It's the warm glow of the fire, just to stare into the embers."

Whereas now, "modern Irish barbecue doesn't really exist", he adds. "It's like the burnt burgers and sausages or maybe a kebab or skewer.

"We have literally everything on our doorstep to create the perfect barbecue" – admittedly without the perfect weather all of the time. That said, "after the year we've just had I think people will be more than happy to get a little bit wet for their endeavours".

We've traded on our bad weather for too long, Reynolds says, and as the surge in popularity of outdoor dining has proved we are a nation that can hack eating outdoors if we need to. So why are we still shy about cooking outdoors, and when we do, why do we only stick to the usual burgers and sausages?

"I think there is that there's a form of intimidation that people have, that they are going to burn it, they get intimidated that they're not doing it right.

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"You got to trust your instincts. It's because it's not just about flavours. It's about the noise, the sizzle. How you can hold your hand over the head with the flame and if it's burning your hands sure enough it's going to burn the meat."

Reynolds knows what he's talking about. Not only did he grow up with a Jamaican grandmother who passed her love of cooking, along with her recipe for scotch bonnet hot sauce, down to him, but he spent six years living in Argentina where "potentially breakfast, lunch and dinner can be done over flame".

"A traditional sunday roast, from our perspective, would be the barbecue", he adds.

One way of getting around that intimidation, he says, is to "think of cooking over the fire as a seasoning". "Think of it like your salt and your pepper, the lick of the flame, or the cinder of a charcoal block is part of seasoning. It's something that's so intrinsic to humanity that everybody understands, the flavour of something over fire."

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His recipes also show that barbecues don't have to be completely meat-based to be showstopping, as many of his recipes are completely vegan. Grilled aubergines, smoked hummus, grilled carrots and plantain are just some of the dishes he's whipped up over the last few months. The key to this is remembering that "when you cook inside, you do the exact same thing outside, just over over fire".

More than anything, however, is to not rush. Watching Nico cook slowly and deliberately over his grills proves that barbecues don't have to be a white-knuckled race through rounds of burgers. "Preparation, preparation, preparation", he stresses.

"Have it in stages, do your sides the night before you get the big piece. Use a thermometer, don't try to be cool thinking, oh, you know the temperatures. Just be safe.

"And realise you're not in a rush either. Definitely the Irish culture with food is that we we've too much convenience in the way we interact with each other. If you rush, you will eventually burn yourself and you will deserve it."

Watch Grill Seeker now on RTÉ Player.