In this series we hear from some well-known people about their favourite dishes, favourite food memories and the people they'd most like to share a meal with.

Today, we're catching up with Patrick Hanlon and Russell Alford; two food writers, content creators, and Eurovision aficionados. They host Chew The Fat, a podcast that saw Nigella Lawson as an early guest, and are about to become published authors. Their first cookbook Hot Fat, will be released as part of a Kickstarter funded series from Blasta Books.

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

What is your earliest food memory?
Russell: So many things! I've got such a love for sweet soda breads which one of my grandmothers would make, slathered in butter and speckled with raisins and sometimes glacé cherries. Then dinners with marrowfat peas, which would soak overnight before being cooked to a mushy consistency. I still have these from time to time when I just want that nostalgic vibe, even though they are still a popular side dish.

Patrick: I remember bringing dinners up to my granny's house every day after school with my Mam, which was like a bit of a ceremony but when I was growing up my Dad worked for Panasonic in Dundalk and took trips to Japan and Singapore every so often –– I would always be excited and amazed to see the foods he would bring home, which were like nothing I had ever experienced before. Even though I was a picky eater growing up, I think that helped set the foundation for a future in food, even if it only kicked in when I was about 20.

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

What's your ultimate comfort food?
P: It's gotta be chips, or at least potatoes in some form. There's nothing like a bowl of colcannon –– it feels like a complete meal every single time and feels like an act of restoration, especially when it's wild outside.

R: I'd also say chips which isn't a surprise to be honest. They're always satisfying, delicious and if you put your mind to it, quite versatile. A chip sandwich, a chip kebab, taco fries, a three in one. Plenty to go on to bring comfort when needed.

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

The best dish that you make?
P: I'm really comfortable in the kitchen, but I don't ever really like doing the same dish twice so I'm quite good at seeing a dish emerge from various odds and ends or bits and pieces around the kitchen. I can be quite thrifty and creative in making a dish from nothing, that's a skill I cherish. I guess 'bowl food' is something I'm good at - combining ingredients, spices, textures in one delicious bowl that keeps you interested 'til the last bite.

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

R: I make the best buttermilk fried chicken. It's something that I have tried and tested about a hundred times over the past year or two, but it is always delicious. Using the best quality chicken available, a delicious blend of flavours and toppings on a brioche bun. It was the basis for our first meal kit with the Hapi Food Co back in May, and a centerpiece of our upcoming book Hot Fat. Yes, finally revealing all my secrets.

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Your favourite restaurant? Go to dish there?
P: Brasserie Zedel in London or Din Tai Fung in Taipei (and various other cities), in Dublin it's Delahunt - I adore what Darren Free and his team have done with both Delahunt, the 'Sitting Room' cocktail bar upstairs and Franks wine bar a little further down Camden Street. My kind of spots!

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

R: We are too alike. I'd probably also say Zedel & Din Tai Fung but I'd throw into the mix Ekstedt in Stockholm. Nordic food cooked without electricity or gas. Just fire. A very special experience. Closer to home, give me a table at Kai in Galway and allow me to order everything off the menu.

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

Best dish you've ever had?
P: I can't pick out one dish but one of my favourite, and most-lamented, former restaurants was Eastern Seaboard in my own hometown, Drogheda. The chef there, Reuven Diaz, every so often had a special which was this incredible spicy crispy pork salad with lots of zingy citrus and the most amazing textures. I still dream about that (and have mined Reuven for the recipe ever since!)

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

R: I am struggling on this! But there is a list, including the entire spread laid out for us at a restaurant high in the Alishan Mountain Range in Taiwan for lunch one day cooked by the chef's mother as they weren't available at that time of day. It was so pure, cooked with love and full of exciting flavours. Others that come to mind include the simple things like Etto's red wine prunes or a cheesy quiche we enjoyed on a trip to visit the Jura region of France which was oozing with Comté and something I have never been able to achieve since.

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

What food do you think is underrated/overrated?
P: Overrated? Most vegan food. I just can't get beyond the fact it can so often be bland, a bit sloppy (or the opposite, a bit too raw) and needs a lot of work to make it "sing", of course there are so many exceptions but on the whole I'm continuously underwhelmed.

Most underrated? Maybe the most misunderstood is deep-frying food –– there's a really ageing sentiment that it's the reserve of sloppy take-away food, but that signature 'crunch' and texture is so essential in so many types of dish, we're so passionate about it we're writing a book on it!

R: On the back of what Patrick said, most underrated food has to be vegetables being cooked really well and being used as the star of the show. There are so many great cookbooks which are especially useful during the summer months, which give great examples of how to enjoy seasonal produce and cook them with respect and with bags of flavour, which a lot "dupes" sometimes lack.

Overrated? This is a tough one and my answer is going to be controversial no doubt, but bacon. Like, if a burger has bacon on it, I'm actually less likely to order it. I don't hate the stuff, I actually love it, but I feel it is often given this seat at the top table when to me, it's just grand! Give me a bacon sandwich for breakfast with lashings of brown sauce. But if you did a kiss, marry, avoid on an Irish breakfast…kiss the puddings, marry the sausages and avoid the bacon.

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

If you could only eat one dish for the rest of your life what would it be?
P: Probably something like ramen or noodles in broth in various different combinations –– I would never get bored. I'm pretty good at pimping up even the simplest packet noodles with little additions that make it sing!

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

R: Boiled eggs and soldiers. During lockdown, with routines going totally out of kilter, we started to try and reinstall the idea of three meals a day rather than what felt like 200 little ones. We started to enjoy two boiled eggs, toasted batch bread with loads of butter every morning during the week and even though the routine of it may get stale, I think I've proclaimed "my goodness I love a boiled egg so much" at least once a week. A little bit of Vegemite or Kallas spread from Sweden adds a bit of a kick too.

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

What would your last meal be?
P: Probably something Korean, as one of our last international trips before the pandemic was 10 days exploring Seoul and Busan and I haven't stopped trying to recreate the flavours at home since. I can't wait to go back and delve a bit deeper. I'd have a big family-style feast with lots of white sticky rice and banchan (side dishes), kalguksu hand-cut noodle soup with mandu dumplings, tteokbokki spicy rice cakes and probably Korean fried chicken somewhere, too!

We need your consent to load this Instagram contentWe use Instagram to manage extra content that can set cookies on your device and collect data about your activity. Please review their details and accept them to load the content.Manage Preferences

R: Anytime I answer this I always answer one of two things: either a beautiful cote de boeuf cooked over the barbecue or my dad's brinner (aka breakfast for dinner). It's essentially a fry-up but with peas and chips. That is something we'd have had on a Saturday growing up from time to time, and it is still one of my favourite things to enjoy!

What 5 guests would you most like to have a dinner party with?
Both: Nigella Lawson, Mary McAleese, RuPaul, Joan Rivers and Kenny Everett.

Food for Thought: Tara Stewart on the joy of dumplings