Steven Soberbergh returns with a tightly wound noir crime caper set in 1950s Detroit

To paraphrase Jan Sterling's quip to Kirk Douglas in Billy Wilder's Ace in the Hole, I've seen a lot of hard-boiled movies in my time, but this - this is twenty minutes.

Ripping a page from Kubrick’s The Killing and Robert Wise’s Odds Against Tomorrow, Steven Soderberg, already a proven master of the crime genre, keeps us suspended in the middle of a wicked web of cross and double cross that sees a mismatched crew of gangsters scrambling for their very lives when they’re the victims of a set-up in 1954 Detroit.

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The gang (a starry cast including a hangdog Benicio Del Toro, a twitchy Kieran Culkin), a cool and calculated Don Cheadle and a grizzled Ray Liotta) are recruited for a seemingly simple job that will see them hold an automobile industry accountant’s family hostage as he retrieves an all-important document from his boss’s safe. However, it soon becomes clear that it’s a set-up and the disparate criminals - already feuding with each other - are forced to work together to uncover what's really going on.

Watch our interview with Benicio Del Toro and Don Cheadle

There is of course a lot more to Ed Solomon’s fiendishly twisty script but that’s our way into a much larger story about corporate corruption and how Motor City was carved up along racial lines in the fifties and from there, he and Soberbergh let human nature do its work as the gang turn increasingly desperate.

Watch our interview with Ray Liotta and Julia Fox

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Determinedly noir in look and atmosphere, No Sudden Move is starkly shot with use of handheld camera, expressionistic angles, and a cool attention to the details of 1950s colour palettes and curves. Meanwhile, David Holmes’ superb soundtrack of nervy jazz has some of the coolness of Lalo Schifrin and a star is born in Julia Fox as a femme fatale straight off a Warners Brothers set in 1940.

There are touches of the Coen Brothers’ black humour and with its over-arching story of municipal corruption and shadowy forces at work, it also recalls LA Confidential.

Watch our interview with Brendan Fraser and Bill Duke

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Moody, broody and crackling with dialled up tension, it’s a gripping old school crime thriller with a killer cast and a plot that will wrongfoot you at every turn.

Alan Corr @CorrAlan2

No Sudden Move is available on Sky Cinema and streaming service NOW from October 9.