The "second chapter" of new music festival  All Together Now takes place at the 3000-acre Curraghmore House in Waterford this weekend and it's already well on the way to becoming the festival for the more discerning music fan. We round for the acts you must see this weekend  

Fontaines DC
Dublin-based Fontaines D.C. are a big selling point for this year's ATN festival. Busy with an exhausting touring schedule abroad, the five piece make a rare Irish appearance in Waterford this weekend and now road-hardened and playing on home turf, you can expect equal parts tenderness and fury from their set. Praised for reawakening the spirit of 1977, as well as The Fall, Whipping Boy, and Joy Division, they've also provided a sharp rebuke to the careerist new school of Irish rock still caught in a post-Coldplay hangover. Fontaines D.C. always serve up a cocktail of literary punk and a kind of primitive Dublin folk, and with front man's Grian Chatten’s unlovely vocal bark to the fore, they sound like they're falling out of an early house as a bloodshot Dublin sky glowers over the Liffey. The band's blistering debut album Dogrel has won them a Mercury Prize nomination and The New York Times recently afforded them a glowing feature. If you think romantic Ireland is dead and gone, get a load of these Liberties Boys and their mix of carnage and poetic longing. Alan Corr

The Good, The Bad & The Queen 
With Blur in mothballs again for the foreseeable, musical polymath Damon Albarn is taking one of his "other bands" around the festivals this summer. In 2018, 11 years after their debut, the cosmopolitan act, featuring Albarn, former Clash bassist Paul Simonon, 78-year-old Nigerian drummer Tony Allen and guitarist/keyboard player Simon Tong (late of the Verve), released their second album, Merrie Land.

On it, they take a good hard look at perfidious Albion and if The Village Green Preservation Society by The Kinks can now be seen as a rueful Brexiteers' concept album, Merrie Land could be a sequel to Blur's brash Parklife as the UK churns its way through another corrosive crisis of identity.

Don’t expect sing-a-long festival joy a la Blur; Albarn has described Merrie Land as "Anglo-Saxostentialist crisis"; the more earthbound Simonon describes it as a work of "modern English folk music with a bit of rub-a-dub in it". It’s a lot of both. Alan Corr

The Wailers
This rhythmically-buoyant band of Jamaicans played Vicar Street on July 23 and All Together Now is also getting the powerful message of Ja love, as delivered by singer David Barrett, who is Rastaman `by lifestyle and culture.' Beginning in 1972, Bob Marley & The Wailers toured the world and played a Dublin date on their final tour with Bob in 1980. Since 1981, bassist and founder member Aston "Familyman" Barrett has carried on the mission to "keep The Wailers together", as Bob requested - "keep me alive through music", as the man said. Led by Familyman, the line-up includes original guitarist Donald Kinsey and singer Shema McGregor, daughter of I Three singer Judy Mowatt. Owen "Dreadie" Reid,who plays bass with Julian Marley’s Uprising band is also on board. Get up, stand up. Paddy Kehoe

Neneh Cherry
It's 30 years since the Swedish-born singer and songwriter burst on to the mainstream music scene with Buffalo Stance, which reached number 3 in the UK charts.

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That was the first of several hits from her 1989 debut album, Raw Like Sushi, although she had been involved in music since her teens, after relocating to London and befriending Ari Up from The Slits. A second album, Homebrew, followed in 1992, and included minor hit Buddy X, while 1994's 7 Seconds, a duet with Youssou N'Dour, gave her a huge international hit.

Shunning the commercial end of the industry (and the nostalgia circuit), in more recent times Cherry's associated more with world music and trip-hop. No surprise given that Massive Attack recorded much of Blue Lines in the home she shared with producer and other half, Cameron McVey. John Byrne

New York Brass Band
Packing an arsenal of relentlessly joyful percussion, sax, trumpets, trombones and sousaphone, this powerhouse seven-piece from North Yorkshire promise to get the party started. From Mardi Gras flair to modern jazz riffs, the New York Brass Band have through-the-roof energy while still channeling the spirit of New Orleans.

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Festival-goers can expect to march to a melting pot of striking sounds from hip hop, funk and electronic beats while honoring multiple generations of musicians from Marvin Gaye to George Michael and Cee-Lo Green to Stevie Wonder. If their recent Glastonbury performance is anything to go by, this is one band camp you will definitely want to put your name down for. Laura Delaney

Anna Calvi 

Countdown to season five of Peaky Blinders driving you crazy? Here's the artist who wrote the score.

Calvi has become one of the most enigmatic singer-songwriters of recent years with a troika of great albums - her self-titled debut, One Breath and last year's Hunter - and as much drama in her music as anything Tommy Shelby and co can come up with onscreen.

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She's going it alone for her early Sunday evening slot in the Something Kind of Wonderful tent, and the roof over her head will ensure that no mystique is lost during daylight hours. Earlier on Sunday, she's also in conversation in the All Curious Minds area, so you never know, you might even get a bit of Peaky Blinders scoop... Harry Guerin

Black Midi

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Freshly anointed with a Mercury Prize nomination for their head wreck of a debut album, Schlagenheim, these London boys craft a wiry, wired and haywire guitar racket as unpredictable and chaotic as Irish heroes Girl Band. Lead singer Geordie Greep (real name: Geordie Greep) has the same needling voice as the late Mark E Smith, with maybe a hint of Howard Devoto of New Wave trailer blazers Magazine, and they're worth seeing alone for kinetic drummer Morgan Simpson. Unpredictable and anarchic, they sound like everything is about to fall apart at any moment, which makes Black Midi all the more compelling. This is music to strangle an algorithm to. Alan Corr

. . . all on the 3000-acre lands of Curraghmore House 

Sing Along Social

Are you a commitment-phobe who can't sing? Well, if so, this gas 'carefree choir' will hit all the right notes for you. The Sing Along Social is a brilliantly bonkers and deliciously fun event where everyone can be international pop stars (cue Louis Walsh's voice) for an hour. The event is fast becoming a mainstay of the Irish festival scene, and it’s easy to see why.

If you love the buzz of singing at the top of your lungs in the shower to your favourite cheesy tunes (hiya Celine) and giving the neighbours an impromptu show, then this mass sing-along might just be your jam. Clothes are advised. Laura Delaney 

Now by RTÉ stage 

RTÉ will curate a special two-day programme for this year's All Together Now, celebrating Irish culture and creativity. The Now by RTÉ stage will be part of the All Curious Minds area, and will run on Saturday and Sunday across the August Bank Holiday weekend. Located on the lawns of the Curraghmore Estate, the stage will feature a wide variety of performances, panel discussions and interviews with highlights from the weekend broadcast on RTÉ Radio 1 and for streaming on the RTÉ Player. More details here

Patti Smith

Don't miss out on the chance to see punk rock icon Patti Smith on the main stage on Saturday night.It is impossible to overstate the influence the American singer-songwriter and poet has had on music since making her debut with her debut studio album Horses in 1975. Her live performances combine her lyrical poetry with rousing rocking out – what more could you want? We can imagine her cover of Gloria by Them will particularly be special in front of an Irish festival audience. Sarah McIntyre

Pussy Riot

Better known for their politics rather than their pop, Russian feminist protest punks Pussy Riot are probably the act at All Together Now that everyone's heard of but very few have heard.

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Formed in 2011, they've staged various unauthorised and provocative guerrilla performances in public places, which were filmed and posted on the Internet. They came to global prominence when they staged an anti-Putin performance inside Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in 2012. Two members, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina, were subsequently jailed.

More recently, they staged a pitch invasion at last summer's World Cup Final in Moscow. They haven't had any conventional record releases, but there are songs available to download and they've a YouTube channel. They've also played live with Madonna, but we won't hold that against them. John Byrne

Saint Sister

Supremely talented musical duo Saint Sister are sure to put on a spellbinding performance on Sunday afternoon on the main stage. Morgan MacIntyre and Gemma Doherty from Derry and Belfast formed the group back in 2014, forging a dreamily unique sound with their blend of harp and synths, with 60s folk leanings.

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Their confident, accomplished debut album Shape of Silence was released last year and features a wealth of put-it-on-repeat tracks including Tír Eile, You Never Call and the beautifully uplifting Twin Peaks. There's surely no better way to ease yourself back into the festival spirit if you’re a bit under the weather after Saturday night...Sarah McIntyre

Jon Hopkins

Jon Hopkins' Singularity is one of the great 'adventure albums' of recent years, and the electronic explorer will make for the best of onstage company in the early hours of Sunday morning. Heck, even the sunrise/sunset cover of Singularity looks like it was designed with festival all-nighters in mind. 

If you were camped in front of your telly for Glastonbury weekend back in June, you may have caught Hopkins' spellbinding set, as a master at building a groove and pushing all the right buttons conquered yet another huge field, while reminding the crowd of just how much space there is in their own hearts. 

We reckon it's written in the stars that he'll be among the acts of the weekend - one of his anthems is called Emerald Rush after all. Harry Guerin

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Full details of this year's All Together Now Can be found here