Will 2018 be our year? Will Ryan O'Shaughnessy break the curse? Will Together be the song to restore Ireland to its rightful place on the champions' throne in Lisbon on May 12th, ending the decades-long suffering that has been inflicted upon us since the dawn of the televote? 

With this year's Eurovision Song Contest edging ever closer, it's the perfect opportunity to trawl through the archives of some of Ireland's greatest hits... as well as the misses. Below, we've ranked our finest Eurovision moments – from the dizzying heights of the mid-nineties glory years to the songs we'd really rather forget. 

10. DONNA & JOE – Love?

When you're beaten into last spot by an actual turkey, you know things are bad. All credit to brother and sister dup Donna and Joe McCaul, who absolutely gave it their best shot with a pretty bog-standard song. It just didn't work on any level whatsoever. Love? Europe didn't even like it and it failed to qualify for the final in 2005, leaving a nation collectively clawing its face with the sheer mortification of it all. 

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9. DUSTIN THE TURKEY - Irelande Douze Pointe

Look, let's just call it satire, okay? It was satire. NOBODY expected us to win Eurovision in 2008 with a rubber turkey from Dublin that was familiar only to a very small percentage of Europe's population (i.e. Irish people), with a song that made references to 'Terry Wogan's wig' and Michael Flatley being a 'yank' over a bad Eurodance soundtrack. Of COURSE we were totally in on the joke, guys. (Probably just as well we didn't even make it out of the semi-final.) 

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8. JEDWARD – Lipstick

First things first: we do need to point out that this song was Ireland's most successful Eurovision entry in ten years. True, it still only came 8th in 2011, but that Top 10 placement went some way to restoring our dignity in the contest. Or at least it would have, if not for those two hyperactive space cadets from The X Factor/your worst nightmare busting out high-kicks like their very lives depended on it. We'll say one thing in their favour: they embraced the campness of Eurovision wholeheartedly. On that count, kudos, Jedward. 

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7. DANA – All Kinds of Everything

An 18-year-old Dana provided Ireland with our first Eurovision win back in 1970 with this ditty, and for that, we shall be eternally grateful as a nation. As for the song? Well... it's a bit cutesy-wutesy for our liking and let's just say that it hasn't aged particularly well – certainly not as well as Sandie Shaw's winning 1967 entry for the UK, Puppet on a String, for example. Sorry, Dana. Thanks, and all... but sorry. 

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6. EIMEAR QUINN – The Voice

In 1996, still riding high on the tidal wave of Oirishness that had been generated by Riverdance exactly two years previously, it seemed that Europe simply couldn't get enough of our mystical gaelic shtick and promptly installed us as winners after a brief blip in 1995 with Eddie Friel's Dreamin (we don't want to talk about it.) That's not to say that The Voice is a bad song – on the contrary. The soaring voice of Anuna's Eimear Quinn was a perfect foil for Brendan Graham's lilting trad/folk song, and look – sure we won, and that's all that counts.

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5. JOHNNY LOGAN - What's Another Year?

Yeah, yeah; by now you're well aware that Johnny Logan is basically the King of Eurovision (which begs the question: why on earth haven't we asked him back?). The Dubliner first did the deed in 1980 with this swoonsome, string-laden love song that positively screamed 'the 1970s' – but it's a fine song that still holds a place in our hearts. We'll even forgive that uncalled-for sax solo. 

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4. LINDA MARTIN - Why Me?

Before she became a panto queen and mortal enemy of Twink, Linda Martin was a pretty capable singer, y'know. Why Me? was her second attempt at Eurovision glory, having finished second in the contest in 1984 with Terminal 3 (also penned by one Mr. J. Logan)  – but what a song to win with. That surging chorus, the drama, the glitzy schmaltz... This one had it all. 

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3. NIAMH KAVANAGH – In Your Eyes 

You want a power ballad, Europe? Hell, we've got one of them, too. This gem of a song, written by Jimmy Walsh, was belted out with gusto by Dublin's Niamh Kavanagh and beat UK entrant Sonia's Better the Devil You Know to make victory even sweeter in 1993. (Fun fact: a then-unknown Idina Menzel was the woman to suggest the song's key change to Walsh, after he asked her to record the demo before bringing it to Kavanagh). 

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2. PAUL HARRINGTON & CHARLIE MCGETTIGAN – Rock 'n' Roll Kids

There is beauty in simplicity, which is exactly why this track has aged so damned well. While other countries added bells, whistles and the kitchen sink to their songs and their staging, Paul Harrington and Charlie McGettigan played it low-key with this gorgeous, wistful, melancholic piano-and-guitar duet that won us the Eurovision in 1994. It still sounds great, too.

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1. JOHNNY LOGAN – Hold Me Now

There's been many a heated argument had across a crowded bar as to which winning Johnny Logan song is better – but there's no question that Hold Me Now pips What's Another Year to the post every time. Logan's 1987 tune still sounds as majestic as ever, 31 years later. 

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