If you're in the mood for some of the finest Irish cinema of recent years, then you'll find that Netflix has a surprisingly generous selection of quality homegrown fare.

Here, then, are some choice pickings from the ever-expanding (and simultaneously contracting) Netflix pile...

The Young Offenders

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Now that dim-but-lovable Corkonian chancers Conor and Jock have become sit-com hall-of-famers, why not revisit the Irish box-office smash that introduced them in a memorable - and utterly hilarious - fashion? Writer/Director Peter Foott put himself on the map with his videos for Rubberbandits; he brings the same anarchic energy - and visual pop - to this caper comedy, inspired by a real-life incident involving the seizure of 1.5 tonnes of cocaine off the Irish coast near Mizen Head in 2007. Truth be told, it all falls apart (albeit in a highly entertaining fashion) before the final whistle, but the winning performances from Alex Murphy and Chris Walley - as the most lovable would-be drug dealers in screen history - make this one sing. What about a sequel?

In Bruges

Martin McDonagh's feature directorial debut remains one of the darkest (and most hilarious) Irish comedies ever – largely thanks to McDonagh's brilliant script and perfectly-pitched performances from Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson as a pair of hitmen trying - and failing - to lay low in the eponymous Belgium city after an assignment goes pear-shaped. Ahead of the trio's reuinion with the eagerly antcipated The Banshees of Inisherin, due in cinemas later this year, it's well worth another look.

Redemption Of A Rogue

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Here's an unsung gem, and a film which deserves a much wider audience; writer/director Philip Doherty's black comedy follows Jimmy (Aaron Monaghan) on his bumpy road to redemption after returning to his hometown to make peace with a troubled past, only to find himself stuck in a Groundhog Day-like purgatory. Shot on a modest budget, this inspired gem is anchored by a breakthrough performance from Monaghan - the actor, not the county, the film was actually lensed in Cavan - long a fixture on the Irish stage, and a total movie star in the making.

The Siege Of Jadotville

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The winner of four IFTAs, this gripping Netflix original tells the true story of the Irish troops, led by Commandant Pat Quinlan, who in 1961 were besieged by overwhelming enemy forces while on a UN peacekeeping mission in the Congo, leading to a six-day standoff against French and Belgian Mercenaries. The film has gone a long way towards recognizing an unsung moment in Irish military history, while also suggesting life for Jamie Dornan as a movie star beyond those horrible (yet lucrative) Fifty Shades movies. That said, he's still prone to the odd misstep...

Wild Mountain Thyme

All right, so it's not strictly recommended, either, but Irish-American playwright John Patrick Shanley's adaptation of his play Outside Mullingar became something of an instant cult classic for all the wrong reasons... Whatever you've heard, it truly has to be seen to be believed. A whimsical rom-com from the creator of Moonstruck, starring Jamie Dornan, Jon Hamm and the great Emily Blunt, filmed at a variety of stunning Mayo locations - what could possibly go wrong? Where to begin? For any Irish person, or anyone who's ever met an actual Irish person, it's hard to get past the accents, Christopher Walken being the main offender - author Seamus O'Reilly later descibed the performances as 'spudface'. Even RTÉ News got in on the joke...