"He was an ordinary man with an absolutely extraordinary talent." Philip King described the late, great Glen Campbell thusly on Today with Sean O'Rourke this morning, following the passing of the country music giant, aged 81.

Below, we celebrate his finest musical moments.

Wichita Lineman

The most significant creative relationship of Campbell's creative career was his collaboration with genius songwriter Jimmy Webb, one of the great songwriter/vocalist duos of all time. Campbell's plaintive, yearning vocals, combined with Webb's heartfelt, melancholy lyrics, gave each of their collaborations an electrifying charge. For many, Wichita Lineman remains their masterpiece, a perfect pop song.

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Galveston

Campbell and Webb's 'town cycle' of songs continues with this tale of a man at war - while Webb originally intended it as an anti-war song, penned during the Vietnam conflict, life-long Republican Campbell's deliberately upbeat delivery sought to change its message to a more defiant, universal one. The brilliance lies in the space in-between. 

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I'm A Believer 

Before he broke big as a solo artist, Campbell was one of the most in demand session musicians in the business - his guitar licks graced everything from Frank Sinatra’s Strangers in the Night to Elvis Presley's Viva Las Vegas, and he was a key contributor to The Beach Boys' seminal Pet Sounds. Here he is providing the iconic lead riff to The Monkees' 1966 smash - sorry kids, they didn't play their own instruments. 

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By The Time I Get To Phoenix

One final Webb-Campbell masterpiece - a tune Frank Sinatra once described as 'the greatest torch song ever written'. We're not prone to disagree. Issac Hayes later stretched this baby out to a whopping 18 minutes and 40 seconds - Campbell pretty much nailed it in less than three.

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Rhinestone Cowboy

Depending on who you're talking to, Campbell's signature tune - and his biggest hit - is either the nadir of his career, or the blueprint for the decades of new country superstars to come. For Irish people of a certain vintage, however, it's a permanent fixture on the soundtrack to the 1970s.

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These Days

In his final years, Campbell bravely continued to perform live while suffering from the debilitating effects of the Alzheimer's disease that ultimately claimed his life, while recording a trio of remarkable records that, at their finest, carry the emotional charge of Johnny Cash's late-era American recordings. His reading of Jackson Browne's These Days, from 2008's Meet Glen Campbell, is a stunner.

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