Chelsea won their first FA Cup when they beat Leeds on this day 50 years a go, in a game which has gone down in history for its ferocity.

Chelsea scored 21 goals en route to Wembley, beating Birmingham, Burnley - after a replay - Crystal Palace, QPR and Watford in the semi-final.

They battered the Hornets 5-1 at White Hart Lane while Leeds needed three games to see off Manchester United in their semi.

Leeds beat Swansea, Sutton, Mansfield and Swindon and twice drew 0-0 with United before beating them 1-0 at Bolton's Burnden Park.

The first final
The original final was held at Wembley on 11 April - a month earlier than usual.

It was down to the Football Association's desire to give England players the best preparation possible as they looked to defend the World Cup in Mexico that summer.

The Horse of the Year Show had taken place at Wembley just a week earlier and the pitch was in poor condition. Jack Charlton headed Leeds in front. Peter Houseman levelled before Mick Jones restored Leeds' lead only for Ian Hutchinson to make it 2-2. 

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The replay
The teams resumed hostilities in the replay at Old Trafford. Chelsea's Peter Bonetti suffered a knee injury after clashing with Jones in the 31st minute.

Jones took advantage by firing Leeds ahead four minutes later but Bonetti - unable to take goal kicks - kept Leeds at bay with several second-half saves.

Peter Osgood levelled with 12 minutes left and David Webb won it in extra-time heading home Hutchinson's long throw at the far post.

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Legacy
The replay is remembered as a ferocious game with Eddie McCreadie's dangerous high challenge on Billy Bremner shocking.

Former Premier League official David Elleray re-refereed the game in 1997 and said he would have issued six red cards, earlier this month current referee Michael Oliver opted for 11 within today's interpretation of the rules.

In the game, Eric Jennings - in his final game as a professional referee - issued just one yellow card when Hutchinson shoved Bremner.