Premier League and English Football League clubs are seeking agreement on a collective wage deferral plan at a meeting with the Professional Footballers' Association on Wednesday.

The BBC has reported that the proposal is one option to help clubs safeguard their financial future during the Covid-19 shutdown.

English football has been suspended until at least 30 April and league authorities have said they will resume action "only when it is safe and conditions allow".

Players at Championship leaders Leeds United have volunteered to take a wage deferral, while Birmingham City have asked some players to take a 50% pay cut over the next four months.

Tottenham Hotspur chairman Daniel Levy has called on Premier League players and managers to help English football deal with the crisis.

"We have seen some of the biggest clubs in the world such as Barcelona, Bayern Munich and Juventus take steps to reduce their costs," said Levy, who revealed Spurs had imposed a 20% pay cut on 550 non-playing staff in April and May.

"We hope the discussions between the Premier League, PFA and LMA (League Managers Association) will result in players and coaches doing their bit for the football ecosystem."

Norwich City on Tuesday said they were taking similar steps to "safeguard future jobs and help sustain the club" through the crisis. The Norfolk club said they would top up the British government's help to ensure staff received their full salaries.

Julian Knight, the Conservative MP who is chair of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport Committee in the British parliament, has condemned such moves.

"It sticks in the throat," said Knight. "This exposes the crazy economics in English football and the moral vacuum at its centre."

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said top players should be the ones who make the sacrifices.

"It should be those with the broadest shoulders who go first because they can carry the greatest burden and have probably got savings, rather than those who were in catering or hospitality who have probably got no savings and live week by week and who probably won't get the (government) benefits for five weeks," he told the BBC.

Former Crystal Palace chairman Simon Jordan said the situation was an "awful look for football.

"I believe there is a moral issue around an industry like football that has been awash with money," Jordan told the talkSPORT radio station.

"Football players and football clubs over the last five years have really had it on their toes with the revenues that have increased because of the broadcasters.

"I think there is a situation here where football has to look at itself and say, 'Do I really, just because the government is offering its teat, have to nuzzle on that?’."

Jonas Baer-Hoffmann, general secretary of FIFPRO, has praised the players who agreed to take pay cuts but warned that the example should not be used to pressure those at smaller clubs.

"We can only appeal to common sense that those measures taken by the elite clubs and players cannot just be transferred downwards," he added.