Dundalk manager Stephen Kenny has stoked the flames ahead of the FAI Cup final with Cork City, lashing out at the Premier Division champions' players for a lack of respect. Here we take a look at what happened there and in some of soccer's fiercest managerial spats.

Stephen Kenny v John Caulfield

Dundalk manager Stephen Kenny has stoked the flames ahead of the FAI Cup final with Cork.

The Lilywhites and Cork have been battling away at the top of the League of Ireland Premier Division for the last three years with Dundalk mostly coming out on top.

However with Cork winning the league this season, the tables have turned and the Rebels aren’t shy about letting their Louth rivals know that.

Kenny was particularly annoyed by a video doing the rounds on social media where Cork goalkeeper goalkeeper Mark McNulty starting a chant of ‘f*** the Lilywhites’ while parading the league trophy.

The Dundalk boss lashed out at that behaviour, along with phonecalls taunting his team’s players: "I think you can have rivalries. Teams don’t have to like each other, there’s nothing abnormal about that, but there has to be a sporting respect. That’s out of the gutter really.

"Not only that but ringing Stephen O’Donnell last year after the cup final when we were on the bus going back home and shouting down the phone taunting Stephen O’Donnell… Stephen is probably the most successful captain of modern times.

"He carries himself with great dignity. He has won five league titles and been in two Europa Leagues but ringing down the phone and taunting him on the phone, we had that. This wasn’t a one-off."

Cork manager John Caulfield was questioned about the incidents but attempted to play them down.

"I haven’t seen it," he said: "I’m not involved in social media but I’m sure there’s a lot of jokes and slagging going on all the time. It’s part and parcel of the craic between the teams, I presume, but there is no harm done to anyone."

This one's still in its infancy but a few more controversial decisions in the Cup final could really light the touchpaper.

*There's an offensive language warning on this video folks.

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Brian Clough v Don Revie

We’re going back a bit for this one, but this is the managerial rivalry which set the template for decades to follow.

Two hugely successful managers with contrasting styles, who couldn’t stand the sight of each other. Such was the enmity between the two that Clough would succeed Revie as manager of Leeds, just to try and prove that he was the better manager.

Revie led Leeds during their most successful period with a brand of tough, physical football and that irked Clough who was in charge of Derby County at the same time, with the two clubs battling it out at the top of the table.

Clough lasted just 44 days in charge of Leeds, alienating their players and their supporters and famously telling the team to "throw your medals in the bin because they were not won fairly."

He left after just six games in charge of the Yorkshire club and famously appeared on television to discuss his exit alongside Revie. It’s a brilliantly tense 25 minutes of television with enmity dripping from both of them, as they are unable to bring themselves to even call each other by their first names.

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Arsene Wenger v Alex Ferguson

Given how long he’s been in charge at Arsenal, Arsene Wenger has had plenty of time to cultivate rivalries.

From Sam Allardyce to Tony Pulis through to Jose Mourinho, Wenger has rowed with them all but none had the intensity of his spats with Alex Ferguson.

While their levels of dislike for each other may have burnt down in recent times, given that Arsenal stopped challenging for first place and went to fighting to fourth, along with Ferguson’s retirement, there was a time in the mid-2000s when these two were constantly at each others throats.

Their rivalry started the moment Wenger took charge of Arsenal with Ferguson distinctly unimpressed with his pedigree, stating: "They say he's an intelligent man, right? Speaks five languages! I've got a 15-year-old boy from the Ivory Coast who speaks five languages!"

Things escalated from there and with both sides slugging it out at the top of the Premier League table, the temperature was turned up and reached a peak in the 2004/05 season when Ferguson was famously pelted with a pizza by Cesc Fabregas in the aftermath of a 2-0 United win, bringing to an end a 49-game unbeaten run for Arsenal.

Ferguson revealed that it might have been more that just pizza that was thrown: "Wenger was criticising my players, calling them cheats, so I told him to leave them alone and behave himself. He ran at me with hands raised saying 'what do you want to do about it?' To not apologise for the behaviour of the players to another manager is unthinkable. It's a disgrace, but I don't expect Wenger to ever apologise, he's that type of person."

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Rafael Bentiez v Jose Mourinho

With the rows between Wenger and Ferguson having reached their peak, football needed a new, bright, young rivalry to keep the fires stoked so step forward Jose Mourinho and Rafa Benitez.

Unlike Wenger and Ferguson, things started out pretty congenial between the two managers and as Benitez commented in 2007: "We were good friends until Liverpool started winning, then he started changing his mind."

Hostilities kicked off in earnest in 2005 when Bentiez’s Liverpool beat Chelsea in the Champions League semi-final, courtesy of Luis Garcia’s so-called ‘ghost goal’, a result which still rankles with Mourinho today.

From then on out, relations between the two managers became very frosty with Mourinho getting the better of Benitez on the domestic front, but not in Europe.

Their paths continued to cross over the years but Mourinho was most irked when Bentiez took over at Chelsea in 2012 as an interim manager. The Blues were all but out of the Champions League when Benitez was appoint but he still managed to help them win that season’s Europa League.

That however did not impress the Portuguese who said: "I don't want to win the Europa League. It would be a big disappointment for me. I don't want my players to feel the Europa League is our competition."

Benitez was similarly withering in his assessment of Mourinho: "At Liverpool, with a squad half of the value of Chelsea, we twice knocked his Chelsea side out of the Champions League. Later, with the most expensive squad at Real Madrid, he did nothing in the Champions League."

Pep Guardiola v Jose Mourinho

With his rivalry with Benitez tapering off, Mourinho needed a new sparring partner. That's when Pep Guardiola came in.

The two managers are battling it out at the top of the Premier League at the moment as they glare at each other across the city of Manchester, but this is a rivalry that started in European football and was honed in La Liga.

Early encounters between the two were relatively tame. Mourinho admitted that his Inter Milan side were second best when Guardiola’s Barcelona dumped them out of the Champions League in 2009 and Guardiola spoke glowingly about the beaten Italian side.

Things really got going in 2010 when Mourinho was handed the reins at Real Madrid and immediately set about needling Guardiola and claimed a 5-0 win in their first El Classico meeting.

Everything escalated from the there that season, building to a Champions League semi-final between the two teams where the two managers really went for it, attacking each other in the media before Barcelona emerged 3-1 winners.

Even then Mourinho couldn’t resist a parting shot, calling up echoes of Clough v Revie, saying: "One day, I would like Josep Guardiola to win this competition properly. I don't know if it is the UNICEF sponsorship or if it is because they are nice guys. I don't understand. They have power and we have no chance."

Anyone expecting matters to settle the next season was sorely mistaken and during the Spanish Super Cup tie between the two sides there was a brawl with Mourinho poking Tito Vilanova, Guardiola's assistant, in the eye.

The animosity between the two paused when Guardiola left Barcelona at the end of the 2011/12 season but even then, Mourinho had to have the last word, saying: "It's his life, but for me it's unthinkable to take a sabbatical. He is younger than me, but I'm not tired."

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Damien Richardson v Dublin

Damien Richardson is not a man to be limited to rivalries with mere individuals. No, a wordsmith like Richardson has his eye on grander things and so in 2006 as manager of Cork City, he declared war of Dublin and the people therein.

Now, to be fair to Rico, he was almost certainly using Dublin as shorthand for the FAI but nevertheless, after months of feeling hard done by in Turners’ Cross and unhappy with the perceived unfairness coming from the FAI, he went on the attack.

It was a FAI Cup defeat against Longford which proved to be the spark that ignited his verbal outburst as he lashed out at referee Ian Stokes, who sent off goalkeeper Michael Devine and who Cork had previous with.

His post-match interview is something which has passed into folklore but is always worth revisting.

"Nothing will happen," he said at the time. "Maybe it was to teach me to keep my place. I am completely disillusioned. We’re from Cork. And what’s happening in Dublin? Nothing.

"They don’t give a s***e. This is our living. And this happens. What am I supposed to do? I spoke to the fourth official. He said I was using bad language. Is bad language worse than a bad tackle? The thin skin of officials is upset by bad language!

"We’re being shagged by Dublin, we’re being ridden rock solid by people in Dublin and it’s never going to change I’m afraid, because that’s where all the power is and that’s where it’s going to stay.

"It’s who you know in Dublin and I’ve been through it many, many times. What still exists in Irish professional football is a link with the past — a Jurassic, neanderthal, old boys’ network. It is all about who you know."

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Martin O’Neill v Everton

It’s fair to say that the Republic of Ireland manager is coming out on top in this particular row, having now seen off two Everton managers in the shape of Roberto Martinez and Ronald Koeman.

At the centre of it all is James McCarthy who has suffered with a series of injuries over the last couple of seasons, with O’Neill and the Everton camp both blaming each other for his lack of fitness.

It started out with Roy Keane claiming that Martinez was over-working his players at Goodison, claiming that McCarthy and Seamus Coleman were arriving to Ireland camps exhausted or not being fit enough to turn up.

Keane was withering in his assessment: "You always get the impression from Everton that Seamus and James are both barely able to walk, that type of thing. So when they actually turn up and they are walking through the reception, Praise the Lord, it’s a miracle."

O’Neill rowed in behind his assistant and relations between Everton and the Ireland camp were decidedly frosty until Martinez was sacked. However the row would deepen when Koeman took over.

Koeman was incensed when McCarthy was included in the Ireland squad to face Wales in a World Cup qualifier back in March, only to pull out of after picking up an injury in training. According to the then-Everton boss, McCarthy was in the squad against medical advice and he placed the blame for his injury squarely on O’Neill and the player.

O’Neill fired back with a strongly worded statement: "Once again the Everton manager, master tactician of the blame game, has struck out in his comments today, criticising both myself and James McCarthy.

"Perhaps a review of Everton’s pre-season programme might provide some enlightenment," was O'Neill's scathing conclusion.

With Koeman now out of a job, whoever is in next at Everton might be well advised to keep quiet about McCarthy's international exploits before talk of 'the O'Neill curse' starts up.