Eddie O'Sullivan believes Ulster's performance at the RDS on Saturday saw them use a template that gives teams the best chance of beating Leinster.

Dan McFarland's side earned a rare away victory over their hosts with an approach that paid dividends, and speaking on RTÉ's Against The Head, former Ireland head coach Eddie O'Sullivan pinpointed elements that troubled Leinster during the United Rugby Championship encounter.

"They have come up with a blueprint to give yourself a chance to beat Leinster," he said.

"You might get a lot of things right and still lose to Leinster but (Ulster) did the key things. They kept Leinster locked in their half and they won the collisions on the gain-line, particularly in the second half when it was most important."

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He added that Ulster's constant pressure was summed up James Hume's intercept try which made sure of the victory in the closing seconds.

"So the template for beating Leinster, if you can pull it off: keep them locked in their half, get off the line, make big tackles and put pressure on by taking space and time away," O'Sullivan continued.

"Easier said than done. But if you can do that, you've a chance of winning."

Ulster also managed a "colossal" seven turnovers and "absolutely destroyed" the Leinster ruck, he added.

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"So if you step back, what you do (against) a team like Leinster who are top dogs in almost every statistic, you take away their territory, you take away the gain-line, you put them under pressure which sounds a bit clichéd but it's important against a team like Leinster," he said.

"Because if you give them space, time and opportunities, they will cut you up. So if anyone's looking at this, they're going to say, 'the chance to beat Leinster, this is where we start.'"

Bernard Jackman pointed out that Dragons used a similar approach earlier in the URC, when Leinster narrowly won, but that they "used it differently" by playing kick tennis.

"It's just interesting will other teams do this now," he pondered.