Martin McHugh believes inter-county managers have the most demanding job in the GAA and will cease to put themselves forward for the role unless they start getting paid.

Peter Creedon became the latest man to leave from his post when he announced his exit from the Laois footballers after just a year at the helm.

There's been  a stream of casualties as the summer has unfolded and Donegal man McHugh - who led Cavan to the Ulster SFC title in 1997 - warned something has to give as the pressure and intensity of the job ratchets up.

"The toughest job in the GAA at the minute is inter-county management," he told the RTÉ GAA Podcast.

"The abuse that a manager gets when a team gets beaten... there's only one team that can win the All-Ireland. Going back to the 70s it was Dublin and Kerry and it's still probably Dublin and Kerry, and that's the way it is.

"You look at Kevin Walsh in Galway: after the Connacht final he was a zero, after the Donegal game he's gone to hero again.

"The stuff that goes up on social media, with people hiding behind names and everything else when putting stuff up, these [managers] have families. I just think it's the toughest job."

McHugh stressed his belief that financial reward is fully merited for managers now, and said without it the well will dry up: "I really feel that an inter-county manager at the minute, unless he's getting really, really well paid for it, I don't think it's worth it. 

"There's already two managers in Ulster left, five in Leinster have left and one in Munster. That's eight gone; there'll probably be at least another four gone this year.

"It is without a doubt the toughest job in GAA at the minute. Nobody's going to do it unless they get really really well paid for it and we're going to have to take a really good look at it because you just will not get inter-county managers.

"The abuse that managers get, it's not worth it and people will not do the jobs in the future."