Leinster Council chairman John Horan has entered the race to the next president of the GAA after being nominated by the Dublin County Board.

Horan took over as Leinster chairman in 2014, having served as vice-chairman, and is bidding to become the first Dublin president of the Association in 55 years.

"I feel quite humbled about the whole thing," he told RTÉ Sport. "It's a great honour to have your name put forward to contest for such a great office in this organisation."

Kerry's Sean Walsh, Galway's Frank Burke, Clare's Robert Frost and Longford's Martin Skelly are also in contention for the presidency.

It's a great honour to have your name put forward to contest for such a great office in this organisation

Horan identified the lingering problem of the club calendar as an issue that needs to be properly addressed, and stressed his belief that the establishment of the Club Players Association (CPA) reflects poorly on the GAA.

The organisation rose in response to frustration with the increasingly demanding GAA season, which sees club games vying for space in the calendar alongside national league and championship fixtures.

However Horan wants to see the long-standing problems met head on. 

"I think the formation of the Club Players Association is a reflection of the fact we as a national organisation have failed to deal with the issue," he told RTÉ Sport.

"We need to grasp it. I'm not saying that anyone hasn't tried - Paraic Duffy has led a crusade in the last few years. I think we just have to address that issue going forward.

I think if we address those issues, maybe a need for such a lobbyist group or body won't be there

"That's the reason the club players association has come into being. I think if we address those issues, maybe a need for such a lobbyist group or body won't be there and we'll look after the needs of the club player."

Horan also called on Croke Park to help find a solution in Leinster's stand-off with Galway.

The Tribesmen have been a part of the provincial championship since 2009 but are unhappy at having to play all their games away from home, and the fact that their minors and U21s are excluded from the underage provincial championships.

"In my time as chairman of the Leinster Council I've met with offices of the Galway County Board on numerous occasions, even to the point that I invited them in to make a full presentation to the Leinster Council meeting," Horan added.

"Unfortunately we just haven't had a coming together of minds on this whole issue and I think at this stage it's probably time for this to be moved up to a national issue of a solution.

"I think it involves more than just Leinster and Galway. It involves the whole hurling community within the country. You can't forget Antrim either at this time because Antrim are struggling.

"They are a great, strong base of hurling but from a competitive point of view it's not happening for them on the national stage. 

"There are a lot of issues there still on the table. Hurling is going well but it still needs to be strengthened in the areas where it is slipping a little bit."

I think the formation of the club players association is a reflection of the fact we as a national organisation have failed to deal with the issue.

"We need to grasp it. I'm not saying that anyone hasn't tried - Paraic Duffy has led a crusade in the last few years. I think we just have to address that issue going forward.

"That's the reason the club players association has come into being."

Meanwhile Laois referee Eddie Kinsella has retired as an inter-county referee after passing the age threshold for inter-county games.

Kinselaa refereed the 2014 All-Ireland final between Kerry and Donegal and his last game in charge was a third round qualifier in Breffni Park between Cavan and Derry.

In 2011 the GAA introduced new measures that meant the cut-off for inter-county referees was 50 yeras of age.