In the immediate aftermath of the drawn All-Ireland football final, teams of people would have been poring over videos of the action from every conceivable angle for both Dublin and Mayo.

Video analysis makes up a major part of any top team’s big-match preparation in modern Gaelic games.

After drilling down for hours into the nitty-gritty of the 2-09 to 0-15 draw between defending champions Dublin and underdogs Mayo on Sunday, 18 September, little nuggets of information will have been found.

They will have been shown to the players and then worked on in training - small weaknesses can be found which need to be strengthened or exploited, depending on the perspective, and whatever was seen to work has to be enhanced.

RTÉ Sport has spent a bit of time reviewing the tapes of the match too, and here we lay out some of the ways both teams will be looking to work on their games and improve.

Mayo Tactical Confusion
In this first set of clips we can see that, while Mayo got so much right with their tactical set-up in the drawn game, particularly in defence, there still seemed to be some confusion about who was doing what at times.

This confusion cost them dearly in the first half when they conceded two own goals and allowed Paddy Andrews pick off two points from the bench, while no one seemed sure who was supposed to be marking him.

Donie Vaughan wore number three, but he played most of the game in the middle of the field, an area further crowded by the presence of Dublin’s Paul Flynn, who was picked at wing-forward.

Mayo’s three middle men were passing the Dubs around and it looked as though there was confusion over who was marking who.

For Dublin’s first goal Michael Darragh Macauley ghosts between Vaughan and Seamus O’Shea and then sets Brian Fenton on his way.

For a later goal chance, O’Shea, Vaughan and Kevin McLoughlin all lost Fenton’s run and it was a surprise that Mayo weren’t better tuned in to stopping one of the most effective ball-in-hand runners in the game.

Once Andrews was introduced, replacing the black-carded James McCarthy, Mayo’s defence was thrown into confusion and at stages it appeared he wasn’t being marked at all.

For his first point Colm Boyle, who had started on Ciaran Kilkenny, was the closest man while for his second, caused by a cheap turnover, wing-forward Diarmuid O’Connor was the nearest to laying a glove on him.

Getting their match-ups right and stopping Fenton in his tracks would be a major help to Mayo Saturdays’ replay.

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Dublin Impatience
Mayo were rightly lauded for their intensity in the tackle and their clever tactical set-up at the back, which held Dublin scoreless (taking out the own goals) for more than half an hour of the first half.

The Dubs too though, must accept their portion of the blame for failing to find the target for so long.

As seasoned championship footballers, Bernard Brogan and Diarmuid Connolly can be expected to set the agenda for their team, and this they did. However, the agenda they set was one of impatience and bad choices.

Rather than holding on to the ball, turning around, recycling and going again, they got sucked into trying to force the chance. In these clips, some of Dublin’s most experienced players can be seen taking on shots that should never be attempted, going for gaps that aren’t there and looking to make passes that weren’t ever on.

A slower than expected build-up and the absence of the normal runners off the shoulder didn't help them either.

The Boys in Blue are likely to meet a similar defensive wall on Saturday and hanging onto the ball, probing for the correct opening, will pay dividends.

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Mayo's Lack of Composure
Stephen Rochford’s side had to work extremely hard for their scores and it was never likely that 15 points was going to be enough to beat this Dublin side. Their defensive system worked well, though it robbed them of bodies up front.

From these clips you can see how Mayo hurt their own chances while on the front foot by giving the ball away cheaply, partly though being short-staffed up front and partly through their own lack of composure on the ball. In the first of them, Keith Higgins’ give-away results directly in Dublin’s second goal.

At the back they lacked composure at times too, typified by goalkeeper David Clarke’s kick-out meltdown in the closing minutes when he gifted possession to Dublin and a point to Diarmuid Connolly.

Gaelic football is now about having the ball and holding on to it. Mayo will need to do this better in the replay.

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Dublin Dead Balls
This is probably the area that Dublin will be hoping to improve upon most and will be thinking will be the easiest to get right.

Dean Rock hauled the Dubs over the finishing line in the semi-final win over Kerry with 0-12, including eight frees and two ’45’s. Against Mayo he managed one third of that, 0-04 (3f), on a day he hit two frees and a ’45’ wide, missed the target once from play and dropped two further efforts short.

He also let a simple ball into his chest slip free for Mayo defender Colm Boyle to inadvertently toe-poke into his own goal. Rock on his best form would have gathered that, turned and shot to the net.

If he can stab over even a slightly higher proportion of his frees in the replay, Dublin will be in a very strong position to retain Sam Maguire for the first time since the seventies.

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