Former Cork hurler and The Sunday Game analyst Tomás Mulcahy admits he would like to manage his native county 'some day'.

The three-time All-Ireland winner, who captained the Rebels to victory in 1990, has previously managed his own club, Cork senior side Glen Rovers, and Waterford club Lismore. He has also served as a selector for the Cork under 21s.

"It is something that is in my mind certainly," he told RTÉ's Different Class podcast. "I wouldn’t rule it out. But the timing has to be right for myself in my own life.

"Would I like to do it? Yes, some day the opportunity might arise. It might never arise.

"I would love to have a go at it but it would have to be on my terms and the way I wanted to do it."

"If I walked into the bank and needed time off on a Monday because we were going out on the lash after winning a Munster final, there was never an issue."

Mulcahy believes that the life of an inter-county hurler has changed drastically since his playing days and that that would be a major consideration for him if he were to take on a management job.

"It has gone to another level now," he said. "I know people say it is a full-time job. I don’t think it is a full-time job but it is close-on [that] and there is so much involved in it with the way the modern game has gone.

"You have to have a very, very good team behind you. You have to have the expertise behind you.

"You have to be a strong character, which I feel I am. You have to have lots of time on your hands - man-management skills are huge in the modern game as well.

"Life has changed from where we were and understanding that is a big thing as well. The modern player could be on 12-hour shifts, working at weekends, he could be doing different things compared to where we were.

"If I walked into the bank and needed time off on a Monday because we were going out on the lash after winning a Munster final, there was never an issue.

"They felt it was all good publicity for them. You were representing the bank and most employers would have felt the same. 

"But times have changed and changed dramatically. There is a lot more pressure on guys with the working side of it, coming out of college, trying to get a job and secure a career for themselves. 

"We did it as the norm but you could have 10 years of hurling now and your education can suffer or something else can suffer. [It's about] getting that balance right.

"I think that is important from a manager's perspective as well. To be able to manage all that and make sure every opportunity is created for guys, that they do well for themselves outside the field of play as well as on the field. That's a big challenge."