A plan to build what would have been the tallest building in the capital has been refused by Dublin City Council.

The proposal would have seen a 24 storey over double basement building constructed on the site of the former City Arts Centre on City Quay in Dublin 2.

The proposed development included an arts centre in the basement, ground and first floor, a gym at ground level and offices from ground to the 23rd floor.

The total floor area would have been 35,910 sq m.

Ventaway Ltd, a company led by developer David Kennan from KC Capital Group and Barry English, the founder and director of Winthrop Engineering, submitted the application.

The proposal received objections from a range of third parties, including An Taisce, the Catholic Archdiocese of Dublin, adjoining neighbour Grant Thornton and the nearby City Quay National School.

In a decision published today, Dublin City Council has refused permission for the project.

It found that having regard to the prominent and sensitive location of the site, the proposed development would seriously detract from the setting and character of the nearby Custom House and its environs due to its scale, bulk and height.

It also found that the proposal would have a significant and detrimental visual impact on the River Liffey Conservation Area and important views and vistas.

"Moreover, due to the excessive scale of the proposed building and its proposed location, removed from the permitted buildings at Tara Street Station and Apollo House, the proposed building would stand apart as an overly assertive solo building which would not form part of a coherent cluster," the planners found.

"The proposal would therefore have a significant and detrimental visual impact on Dublin's historic skyline, by reason of fragmentation and visual intrusion and would thereby seriously injure the urban character of the City Centre skyline, would create a precedent for similar type undesirable development and would be contrary to the proper planning and sustainable development of the area."

The council also concluded that because of its scale the scheme would likely have "noticeable and detrimental overbearing and overshadowing impacts on neighbouring property."

"The proposed development would therefore constitute an overdevelopment of the subject site, would seriously injure the amenities of neighbouring property, would devalue property in the vicinity, create a precedent for similar type undesirable development and would be contrary to the proper
planning and sustainable development of the area," it said.

It is now open to the applicants to appeal the decision to An Bord Pleanála.