Employees should work from home from today unless it is necessary to attend the workplace in person.

The measures are among the latest Government restrictions being put in place to stem the spread of Covid-19.

Just two months after a gradual return to the workplace began, the situation is going into reverse.

Under the latest guidelines, unless it is necessary to attend the workplace in person, everyone should revert to working from home.

Those attending cinemas and theatres will need Covid-19 passes based on vaccination or recovery to be let in.

Closing times for licensed premises, including hotel bars and hotel residents' bars, will move to midnight.

All customers will need to have left the premises by that time, regardless of the event taking place, including weddings.

The latest restrictions were announced by the Government earlier this week in an effort to slow the spread of Covid-19.


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Former INMO General Secretary Liam Doran said he would support the introduction of more restrictions.

Speaking on RTÉ's Today with Claire Byrne, Mr Doran said people should limit their social contacts "until we get to a situation where we have the booster vaccine in place" because the health service will not be able to cope between now and then.

"When you have a situation that the figures are increasing at the extent they're increasing, until we get to that threshold of booster presentation and delivery, we have to curb human activity within society", he said, adding that there is a need for "more stringent measures from the top" telling people what they can and cannot do.

"We've had a total absence of leadership and statesmen-like behaviour in my view over the last number of weeks," Mr Doran said.

"I think in fairness to the HSE senior officials, they were saying six and eight weeks ago, as much as they can say, that the health service was heading down a bad place, that the level of transmission, the number of presentations was going to exceed the ability to cater for, and the Government still went ahead and continued with its careful reopening of the economy.

"Twenty-nine days later, they shut down night clubs."

Mr Doran described the booster programme as the "only bullet we have in our armoury" and said it was "disappointing" that some people were not attending vaccination appointments.