The Central Statistics Office has today published a snapshot of the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the country over 12 months from the first confirmed case of Covid-19 here on February 29, 2020.

The CSO said the knowledge that behind every statistic is a real person or a business is at the heart of all that it does.

It said it will continue to bring clarity, insight and transparency around what is happening in the economy and society due to the Covid-19 virus.

Statistics gathered during the year by the CSO shows that proportionally, Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, Louth and Monaghan were the counties hardest hit in terms of Covid-19 cases.

Cavan, Dublin, Kildare, Mayo and Monaghan were proportionally the counties with the most deaths. 

The CSO said its statistics gathered during the year shows that proportionally, Dublin, Donegal, Limerick, Louth and Monaghan were the counties hardest hit in terms of Covid-19 cases.

Cavan, Dublin, Kildare, Mayo and Monaghan were proportionally the counties with the most deaths, it added. 

The 25-44 age group saw the most confirmed cases of Covid-19, while 93% of all Covid-19 reported deaths were among those aged 65 years and over. 

The CSO said that in April, 70.4% of enterprises had lower than normal turnover.

Between July and August 2020, it said that more than 96% of responding enterprises were trading in some capacity, 2.5% of enterprises had ceased trading temporarily while 1.2% had ceased trading permanently. 

In June, the median spend of implementing measures to comply with Covid-19 requirements on small businesses with between 20 and 49 employees was €4,000.

This median spend increased to €42,500 for large enterprises, the CSO added.

Today's figures from the CSO also show that retail sales in December were 10.4% higher than in February before the crisis started. 

The sectors which were lower than February were bars (-62.4%), books, newspapers and stationery (-11.1%), department stores (-4.5%) and fuel (-0.7%). 

Meanwhile, the sectors with the highest increases since February were hardware, paints & glass (+30.5%), food, beverages & tobacco (specialised stores) (+23.3%), motor trades (+20.4%) and other retail sales (+21.8%).

By the week ending December 14, new spending on debit and credit cards had increased significantly to €1.854 billion, a rise of 111.9% from April 2020.

The CSO said that while the standard measure of monthly unemployment was 5.8% in January, the Covid-19 adjusted measure of unemployment indicates a rate as high as 25% if all claimants of the Pandemic Unemployment Payment were classified as unemployed.

Today's figures also show that less than 4.5 million overseas passengers travelled to and from Ireland during  2020. This compares to 20.1 million and 20.2 million overseas arrivals and departures respectively in 2019.

They also noted that in the week beginning January 24, car traffic volumes were 55.2% lower in regional locations and 53% lower in Dublin when compared with the same week in 2020 as Level 5 travel restrictions remain in place.

Meanwhile, nearly 45% of respondents in November 2020 reported that something in their lives has changed for the better since the onset of the Covid-19 crisis with more than one in two (51.0%) women and almost four in ten (38.4%) men reporting this.  

But almost six in ten respondents to the February 2021 Social Impact of Covid-19 survey believe that the pandemic has impacted negatively on their mental health.