Apple chief Tim Cook has vowed that creativity would remain in the company's "DNA" and hinted that products on the horizon could come in the area of television.

Cook was the star opening guest at a prestigious All Things Digital conference hosted by the Rupert Murdoch owned technology news website at a resort in the California town of Palos Verdes.

"We're going to introduce some great stuff," Cook said. "I think you are going to love it."  

Cook declined to reveal details of products set for release by the California-based maker of iPads, iPhones, iPods, Macintosh computers, and Apple TV devices.

But the first unveiling could take place as soon as June 11, when Apple kicks off its annual Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco.

While avoiding specifics, Cook said that the Apple TV business is "an area of intense interest for us." Apple has long referred to Apple TV - boxes that route content from the Internet to television screens - as a hobby.

Apple sold 2.8 million Apple TV devices last year and nearly that many in the first few months of this year, according to Cook.

Apple's nascent iCloud online data storage service and close relationships with film and television studios that sell digital content for viewing on its gadgets could support a new Apple TV offering.

Cook spoke of lessons learned from late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who turned the helm over to Cook in August of last year after becoming too ill to continue, and of finding his own stride out of his predecessor's shadow.

"I learned a lot from Steve," 51-year-old Cook said during an interview at the conference.

"It was the saddest day of my life when he passed away," he said. "But at some point last year somebody kind of shook me and said it's time to get on. The sadness was replaced by this determination to continue the journey."

Lessons learned from Jobs included focusing on doing a few things exceptionally well, shunning mediocrity, and casting the rest aside, according to Cook.

Under Cook's watch, Apple has implemented a philanthropic programme matching donations made by employees while it has embarked on a campaign to improve working conditions at plants in China where its gadgets are made.

Cook said Apple is "micromanaging" its contractors in China to improve working conditions and curb excessive overtime, which has been "tricky" since there are employees who want to rack up lots of hours to make extra money.